Melville Bay

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The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. The Columbia University Press

Melville Peninsula

Melville Peninsula, 24,156 sq mi (62,564 sq km), c.250 mi (400 km) long and from 70 to 135 mi (113–217 km) wide, Nunavut, Canada, between the Gulf of Bothnia and Foxe Basin, and separated from Baffin Island to the N by the Fury and Hecla Strait; it is joined to the mainland by the Rae Isthmus. Numerous streams radiate from the peninsula's central hilly section, which rises to 1,850 ft (564 m). Hall Lake (c.200 sq mi/520 sq km) lies near the northeast coast, and in the southern portion of the peninsula are many connected lakes. The tundra-covered region is virtually uninhabited and is of little importance economically. There is a trading post at Repulse Bay on the south coast and an air station near Hall Lake.

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/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/melville-lake

Copyright The Columbia University Press

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. The Columbia University Press

Melville, Lake

Lake Melville, saltwater lake, 1,133 sq mi (2,934 sq km), SE Labrador, N.L., Canada, extending c.120 mi (190 km) inland from Hamilton Inlet, an arm of the Atlantic Ocean. It receives the Churchill River in Goose Bay, its southwest arm, and the Naskaupi River. Rigolet, a Hudson's Bay Company post, is on the lake.

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/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/melville-bay

Copyright The Columbia University Press

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. The Columbia University Press

Melville Bay

Melville Bay, broad indentation of the western coast of Greenland, opening to the SW into Baffin Bay. The inland ice cap comes down to the coast, and glaciers discharge much ice into its waters.

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