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tweed (fabric)

tweed, rough, unfinished woolen fabric, of a soft, open, flexible texture resembling cheviot or homespun, but more closely woven. It is made in either plain or twill weave and may have a check, twill, or herringbone pattern. Subdued, interesting color effects (heather mixtures) are obtained by twisting together different-colored woolen strands into a two- or three-ply yarn. Tweeds are desirable for outer wear, being moisture resistant and very durable.

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Tweed (river, Scotland)

Tweed, river, 97 mi (156 km) long, rising in the Southern Uplands of Scotland. It flows E through S Scotland then NE, forming the Scotland-England border for 17 mi (27 km) before entering the North Sea at Berwick, NE England. The Tweed system drains most of SE Scotland; the Gala, Ettrick, and Teviot are its chief tributaries. In Scotland the Tweed waters a sheep-farming region and passes Peebles, Melrose, and Kelso. The Tweed also has rich salmon fisheries.

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tweed

tweed / twēd/ • n. a rough-surfaced woolen cloth, typically of mixed flecked colors, originally produced in Scotland: [as adj.] a tweed sports jacket. ∎  (tweeds) clothes made of this material: boisterous Englishwomen in tweeds.

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tweed

tweed Rough-textured cloth, usually all wool, from which warm clothes are made. Tweed originated in Scotland, but is now made in many countries. After spinning, the yarn is dyed with local lichens, giving the cloth its characteristic smell.

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tweed

tweed XIX. Trade name originating in a misreading of tweel or tweeled, Sc. forms of TWILL, TWILLED, assisted by assoc. with the river Tweed.

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tweed

tweedaccede, bead, Bede, bleed, breed, cede, concede, creed, deed, Eid, exceed, feed, Gide, God speed, greed, he'd, heed, impede, interbreed, intercede, Jamshid, knead, lead, mead, Mede, meed, misdeed, mislead, misread, need, plead, proceed, read, rede, reed, Reid, retrocede, screed, secede, seed, she'd, speed, stampede, steed, succeed, supersede, Swede, tweed, weak-kneed, we'd, weed •breastfeed • greenfeed • dripfeed •chickenfeed • spoonfeed • nosebleed •Nibelungenlied • invalid • Ganymede •Runnymede • airspeed • millipede •velocipede • centipede • Siegfried •filigreed • copyread • crossbreed •proofread • flaxseed • hayseed •rapeseed • linseed • pumpkinseed •aniseed • oilseed • birdseed • ragweed •knapweed • seaweed • chickweed •stinkweed • blanket weed • bindweed •pondweed • duckweed • tumbleweed •fireweed • waterweed • silverweed

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