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Malmédy Massacre

MALMÉDY MASSACRE

MALMÉDY MASSACRE (17 December 1944). During the Battle of the Bulge, the First SS Panzer Division under Lieutenant Colonel Joachim Peiper overran a convoy of Battery B, 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion, in the Belgian Ardennes near the town of Malmédy. On 17 December 1944, the Germans marched approximately one hundred unarmed American prisoners into a field and systematically shot them. A few feigned death and escaped; eighty-six died. Peiper and seventy-two others were subsequently tried and convicted by an American tribunal. Forty-three, including Peiper, were sentenced to death by hanging, the others to imprisonment ranging from ten years to life. The death sentences were later commuted, and none of the convicted served a full prison sentence. Peiper was paroled after ten years.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bauserman, John. The Malmédy Massacre. Shippensburg, Pa.: White Mane, 1995.

Gallagher, Richard. The Malmédy Massacre. New York, 1964.

Weingartner, James J. Crossroads of Death: The Story of the Malmédy Massacre and Trial. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.

Whiting, Charles. Massacre at Malmédy: The Story of Jochen Peiper's Battle Group, Ardennes, December, 1944. New York: Stein and Day, 1971.

Charles B.MacDonald/a. r.

See alsoAtrocities in War ; Bulge, Battle of the ; Violence ; War, Laws of .

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Malmédy

Malmédy (mälmādē´), commune (1991 pop. 10,291), Liège prov., E Belgium, near the German border. Economic mainstays are tourism and the manufacture of beer, paper, and tanning fluid. The town and the surrounding district belonged to the abbey of nearby Stavelot until they passed (1815) to Prussia. Malmédy and Eupen were transferred to Belgium by the Treaty of Versailles after World War I. In World War II heavy fighting occurred at Malmédy during the Battle of the Bulge (Dec., 1944) and 72 U.S. prisoners of war were massacred by German troops.

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