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robin

robin a small brown bird with a red breast, which legendarily was coloured by the blood of Christ. The robin is traditionally taken as a harbinger of death; there was also a tradition that robins would cover the bodies of the unburied dead with leaves. The name comes (in late Middle English, as robin redbreast) from Old French, pet form of the given name Robert.
the robin and the wren are God's cock and hen; the martin and the swallow are God's mate and marrow proverbial saying, late 18th century (marrow in the second line means ‘companion’); there was a traditional belief that the robin and the wren were sacred birds, and that to harm them in any way would be unlucky.

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robin

rob·in / ˈräbən/ • n. 1. a large New World thrush (genus Turdus) that typically has a reddish breast. Its numerous species include the familiar American robin (T. migratorius). 2. any of a number of other birds that resemble the American robin, esp. in having a red breast, in particular a small Old World thrush (Erithacus and other genera) related to the chats, typically having a brown back with red on the breast or other colorful markings. Its numerous species include the European robin (E. rubecula).

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robin

robin small red-breasted bird. XVI. Short for r. redbreast (XV), both being Sc. in their earliest use. — OF. Robin, familiar var. of the masculine name Robert (used XV for ‘robin’). In round r. (XVIII) the adj. describes the circular unpunctuated list of names on the document; the reference of the sb. is unkn.

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robin

robinagin, akin, begin, Berlin, bin, Boleyn, Bryn, chin, chin-chin, Corinne, din, fin, Finn, Flynn, gaijin, gin, Glyn, grin, Gwyn, herein, Ho Chi Minh, in, inn, Jin, jinn, kin, Kweilin, linn, Lynn, mandolin, mandoline, Min, no-win, pin, Pinyin, quin, shin, sin, skin, spin, therein, thin, Tientsin, tin, Tonkin, Turin, twin, underpin, Vietminh, violin, wherein, whin, whipper-in, win, within, Wynne, yin •weigh-in • lutein • lie-in • Samhain •Bowen, Cohen, Owen, throw-in •heroin, heroine •benzoin •bruin, ruin, shoo-in •Bedouin • Islwyn •genuine, Menuhin •cabin, Scriabin •Portakabin • sin bin • swingbin •bobbin, dobbin, robin •haemoglobin (US hemoglobin) •Reuben • dubbin • dustbin • Jacobin •kitchen, lichen •Cochin • urchin

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robin

robin or robin redbreast, common name for a migratory bird of the family Turdidae (thrush family).

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robin

robin Small Eurasian bird, with a characteristic red-orange breast. Length: to 14cm (5.5in). Family Turdidae; species Erithacus rubecula. The much larger American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a member of the thrush family and is c.25cm (10in) long.

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