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sponsor

spon·sor / ˈspänsər/ • n. 1. a person or organization that provides funds for a project or activity carried out by another, in particular: ∎  an individual or organization that pays some or all of the costs involved in staging a sporting or artistic event in return for advertising. ∎  a person who pledges to donate a certain amount of money to another person after they have participated in a fund-raising event organized on behalf of a charity. ∎  a business or organization that pays for or contributes to the costs of a radio or television program in return for advertising. 2. a person who introduces and supports a proposal for legislation: a leading sponsor of the bill. ∎  a person taking official responsibility for the actions of another: they act as informants, sponsors, and contacts for new immigrants. ∎  a godparent at a child's baptism. ∎  (esp. in the Roman Catholic Church) a person presenting a candidate for confirmation. • v. [tr.] 1. provide funds for (a project or activity or the person carrying it out): Joe is being sponsored by his church. ∎  pay some or all of the costs involved in staging (a sporting or artistic event) in return for advertising. ∎  pledge to donate a certain sum of money to (someone) after they have participated in a fund-raising event organized on behalf of a charity. ∎  [often as adj.] (sponsored) pledge to donate money because someone is taking part in (such an event): they raised $70 by a sponsored walk. 2. introduce and support (a proposal) in a legislative assembly: Senator Hardin sponsored the bill. ∎  propose and organize (negotiations or talks) between other people or groups: the U.S. sponsored negotiations between the two sides. DERIVATIVES: spon·sor·ship / ship/ n. ORIGIN: mid 17th cent. (as a noun): from Latin, from spondere ‘promise solemnly’. The verb dates from the late 19th cent.

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sponsor

sponsorAlissa, Clarissa, kisser, Larissa, Marisa, Melissa, Orissa, reminiscer •fixer, mixer, sixer •convincer, mincer, pincer, rinser, wincer •Amritsar, Maritsa, spritzer •howitzer • kibitzer • purchaser •artificer • officer • surfacer • Pulitzer •Wurlitzer • promiser • harnesser •menacer •practiser (US practicer) •de-icer, dicer, enticer, gricer, paise, pricer, ricer, slicer, splicer •Schweitzer •Barbarossa, dosser, embosser, fossa, glosser, josser, Ossa, Saragossa, tosser •boxer • sponsor • matzo • bobbysoxer •Chaucer, courser, endorser (US indorser), enforcer, forcer, reinforcer, saucer, Xhosa •balsa, waltzer •dowser, grouser, Hausa, mouser, Scouser •announcer, bouncer, denouncer, pouncer, pronouncer, renouncer, trouncer •schnauzer

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