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epistle

e·pis·tle / iˈpisəl/ • n. formal a letter. ∎  a poem or other literary work in the form of a letter or series of letters. ∎  (also Epistle) a book of the New Testament in the form of a letter from an Apostle: St. Paul's epistle to the Romans. ∎  an extract from an Epistle (or another New Testament book not a Gospel) that is read in a church service. ORIGIN: Old English, via Latin from Greek epistolē, from epistellein ‘send news,’ from epi ‘upon, in addition’ + stellein ‘send.’ The word was reintroduced in Middle English from Old French.

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epistle

epistle (ĬpĬs´əl), in the Bible, a letter of the New Testament. The Pauline Epistles (ascribed to St. Paul) are Romans, First and Second Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, First and Second Thessalonians, First and Second Timothy, Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews. The Catholic, or General, Epistles are James; First and Second Peter; First, Second, and Third John; and Jude. This classification is traditional. There is an Epistle of Jeremiah in Baruch. In traditional Christian liturgies, the Epistle is normally a portion of one of these letters read aloud.

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epistle

epistle apostolic letter of the N. T. XIII; (gen.) letter XIV. OE. epistol, beside pistol, ME. pistle — L. epistola; ME. epistle — OF. epistle (mod. épître) — L. epistola — Gr. epistolḗ, f. epistéllein send, esp. as a message, f. EPI- +stéllein send.
So epistolary XV. f. F. épistolaire or L. epistolāris.

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Epistle

Epistle in the Christian Church, a book of the New Testament in the form of a letter from an Apostle.

Epistle also denotes an extract from an Epistle (or another New Testament book not a Gospel) that is read in a church service.
Epistle side in a church, the south end of an altar, from which the Epistle is traditionally read (opposite to the north or Gospel side).

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Epistle

Epistle. The usual word for a letter, especially of the New Testament, and in liturgical use.

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epistle

epistlehassle, Kassel, passel, tassel, vassal •axel, axle •cancel, hansel, Hänsel, Mansell •transaxle •castle, metatarsal, parcel, tarsal •chancel • sandcastle • Newcastle •Bessel, nestle, pestle, redressal, trestle, vessel, wrestle •Edsel • Texel •intercensal, pencil, stencil •pretzel • staysail • mainsail • Wiesel •abyssal, bristle, epistle, gristle, missal, scissel, thistle, whistle •pixel • plimsoll •tinsel, windsail •schnitzel, spritsail •Birtwistle •paradisal, sisal, trysail •apostle, colossal, dossal, fossil, glossal, jostle, throstle •consul, proconsul, tonsil •dorsal, morsel •council, counsel, groundsel •Mosul • fo'c's'le, forecastle •bustle, hustle, muscle, mussel, Russell, rustle, tussle •gunsel • corpuscle •disbursal, dispersal, Purcell, rehearsal, reversal, succursal, tercel, transversal, traversal, universal •Herzl

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