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Sturgis, Russell

Sturgis, Russell (1836–1909). American architect. He worked for Eidlitz before a period of study in Munich (from 1859), where he absorbed the essences of various medieval styles as well as acquiring a sound grasp of constructional principles. Setting up in practice in NYC (1863), his works included Farnam Hall, Yale University, New Haven, CT (1869–70), a well-composed Gothic Revival essay, and the Farnam House, New Haven (1884), in the Queen Anne style. His assistants included G. F. Babb, C. F. McKim, and W. R. Mead (of McKim, Mead, & White). He compiled the important Dictionary of Architecture and Building, Biographical, Historical, and Descriptive (1901–2), and built up the Avery Library, Columbia University.

Bibliography

ARe, xxv (1909), 146, 220, 404–10, xxvi (1909), 123–31, 393–416;
Doumato (1985b);
Placzek (ed.) (1982);
Sturgis et al. (1901–2, 1971, 1971a, 1977);
van Vynckt (ed.) (1993))

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Sturgis, Russell

Russell Sturgis (stûr´jĬs), 1836–1909, American architect and writer, b. Baltimore co., Md., grad. College of the City of New York, 1856. He practiced architecture until 1880; the buildings he designed include the Flower Hospital in New York City and a chapel and several dormitories at Yale Univ. A leading authority on the history of architecture and art, Sturgis published many articles and gave lectures at universities and museums. He was first president (1895–97) of the Fine Arts Federation and president (1889–93) of the Architectural League of New York. His writings include European Architecture (1896), A Dictionary of Architecture and Building (3 vol., 1901–2), and History of Architecture (4 vol., 1906–15; Vol. III–IV completed after his death by A. L. Frothingham, Jr.).

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