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canker

can·ker / ˈkangkər/ • n. 1. a necrotic, fungal disease of apple and other trees that results in damage to the bark. ∎  an open lesion in plant tissue caused by infection or injury. ∎  fungal rot in some fruits and vegetables, e.g., parsnips and tomatoes. 2. Med. an ulcerous condition or disease, in particular: ∎  (also canker sore) a small ulcer of the mouth or lips. ∎  another term for thrush2 (sense 2). ∎  ulceration of the throat and other orifices of birds, typically caused by a protozoal infection. ∎  (also ear can·ker) inflammation of the ear of a dog, cat, or rabbit, typically caused by a mite infestation. ∎ fig. a malign and corrupting influence that is difficult to eradicate: [in sing.] racism remains a canker. • v. 1. [intr.] (of woody plant tissue) become infected with canker: [as n.] (cankering) we found some cankering of the wood. 2. [tr.] [usu. as adj.] (cankered) infect with a pervasive and corrupting bitterness: he hated her with a cankered, shameful abhorrence. DERIVATIVES: can·ker·ous / -kərəs/ adj.

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"canker." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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canker

canker, small sore on the inside of the mouth. A canker appears as a shallow, whitish ulcer surrounded by a thin, red area. It is tender, sometimes painful, and may occur singly or as one of a group of sores. Cankers develop on the inner surfaces of the lips or cheeks, on the gums, under the tongue, or on the roof of the mouth. The cause is unknown, but cankers have been associated with friction, injury, allergy, and viral infection. They generally heal by themselves in a few days but can be recurrent.

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canker

canker A general term for a localized disease of woody plants in which bark formation is prevented. Cankers may be caused by bacteria or fungi, or occasionally even by viruses.

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canker

canker A general term for a localized disease of woody plants in which bark formation is prevented. Cankers may be caused by bacteria or fungi, or occasionally even by viruses.

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canker

canker OE. cancer, reinforced or superseded by ONF. cancre, var. of (O)F. chancre :- L. cancer CANCER.

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canker

cankeralpaca, attacker, backer, clacker, claqueur, cracker, Dhaka, hacker, Hakka, knacker, lacquer, maraca, paca, packer, sifaka, slacker, smacker, stacker, tacker, tracker, whacker, yakka •Kafka •anchor, banker, Bianca, canker, Casablanca, Costa Blanca, flanker, franker, hanker, lingua franca, Lubyanka, rancour (US rancor), ranker, Salamanca, spanker, Sri Lanka, tanka, tanker, up-anchor, wanker •Alaska, lascar, Madagascar, Nebraska •Kamchatka • linebacker • outbacker •hijacker, skyjacker •Schumacher • backpacker •safecracker • wisecracker •nutcracker • firecracker • ransacker •scrimshanker • bushwhacker •barker, haka, Kabaka, Lusaka, marker, moussaka, nosy parker, Oaxaca, Osaka, parka, Shaka, Zarqa •asker, masker •backmarker • waymarker •Becker, checker, Cheka, chequer, Dekker, exchequer, Flecker, mecca, Neckar, Necker, pecker, Quebecker, Rebecca, Rijeka, trekker, weka, wrecker •sepulchre (US sepulcher) • Cuenca •burlesquer, Francesca, Wesker •woodpecker

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