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puncture

punc·ture / ˈpəngkchər/ • n. a small hole in a tire resulting in an escape of air: she was on her way home when she had a puncture. ∎  a small hole in something such as the skin, caused by a sharp object: surgeons operate through small punctures in the skin | [as adj.] a puncture wound. • v. [tr.] make such a hole in (something): one of the knife blows had punctured a lung. ∎  [intr.] sustain such a small hole: the tire had punctured and it would have to be replaced. ∎ fig. bring about a dramatic reversal in (mood or behavior) resembling a sudden deflation or collapse: the earlier mood of optimism was punctured. ORIGIN: late Middle English: from Latin punctura, from punct- ‘pricked,’ from the verb pungere. The verb dates from the late 17th cent.

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puncture

puncture (punk-cher)
1. n. a wound made accidentally or deliberately by a sharp object or instrument. needle p. a puncture using a hollow needle to withdraw a sample of tissue (especially from the liver, bone marrow, or breast) for examination for diagnostic purposes. See also lumbar (puncture).

2. vb. to pierce a tissue with a sharp instrument.

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puncture

puncturebotcher, gotcha, top-notcher, watcher, wotcha •imposture, posture •firewatcher • birdwatcher •debaucher, scorcher, torture •Boucher, voucher •cloture, encroacher, poacher, reproacher •jointure • moisture •cachucha, future, moocher, smoocher, suture •butcher •kuccha, scutcher, toucher •structure •culture, vulture •conjuncture, juncture, puncture •rupture • sculpture • viniculture •agriculture • sericulture •arboriculture • pisciculture •horticulture • silviculture •subculture • counterculture •aquaculture • acupuncture •substructure • infrastructure •candidature • ligature • judicature •implicature •entablature, tablature •prelature • nomenclature • filature •legislature • musculature •premature • signature • aperture •curvature •lurcher, nurture, percher, searcher

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