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midwife

mid·wife / ˈmidˌwīf/ • n. (pl. -wives ) a person (typically a woman) trained to assist women in childbirth. ∎ fig. a person or thing that helps to bring something into being or assists its development: he survived to be one of the midwives of the Reformation. • v. [tr.] assist (a woman) during childbirth. ∎ fig. bring into being: revolutions midwifed by new technologies of communication. DERIVATIVES: mid·wife·ry / midˈwīf(ə)rē; -ˈwīf(ə)rē/ n.

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midwife

midwife (mid-wyf) n. (in Britain) a health-care professional who, having undertaken a three-year period of study, is qualified to provide advice, care, and support for women and their families during the antenatal, intranatal, and postnatal periods. Midwives work in a variety of care settings. See also community midwife.
midwifery (mid-wif-ri) n.

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midwife

midwife XIV. prob. f. mid (prep. and adv.) with, together + WIFE in the sense ‘woman’, the notion being ‘a woman who is with the mother at the birth’.
Hence midwifery XV.

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midwife

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