epitaph

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epitaph, strictly, an inscription on a tomb; by extension, a statement, usually in verse, commemorating the dead. The earliest such inscriptions are those found on Egyptian sarcophagi. In England epitaphs did not begin to assume a literary character until the time of Elizabeth I. Ben Jonson, John Milton, Alexander Pope, and Samuel Johnson were considered masters of the art. The epitaph on Ben Jonson's own tomb in Westminster Abbey was splendidly brief: "O rare Ben Jonson!" Epitaphs are often humorous. It is not known whether the epitaph printed below is amusing by design or by accident: Here lie I Martin Elginbrodde: Have mercy on my soul, Lord God, As I wad do, were I Lord God, And ye were Martin Elginbrodde.

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ep·i·taph / ˈepiˌtaf/ • n. a phrase or statement written in memory of a person who has died, esp. as an inscription on a tombstone.

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epitaph XIV. — (O)F. épitaphe — L. epitaphium funeral oration — Gr. epitáphion, f. EPI- + táphos obsequies, tomb.

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epitaph a phrase or form of words written in memory of a person who has died, especially as an inscription on a tombstone. The word is recorded from late Middle English, and comes via Old French and Latin from Greek epitaphion ‘funeral oration’.

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epitaph. Inscription on a funerary monument, tombstone, etc.