Skip to main content
Select Source:

Curiosity

147. Curiosity

  1. Anselmo so assured of wifes fidelity, asks friend to try to corrupt her; friend is successful. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote ]
  2. Cupid and Psyche her inquisitiveness almost drives him away forever. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 27]
  3. Curious George inquisitive, mischievous monkey. [Childrens Lit.: Curious George ]
  4. Fatima Bluebeards 7th and last wife; her inquisitiveness uncovers his murders. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Harvey, 9798]
  5. Faustus, Doctor makes demonic compact to sate thirst for knowledge. [Br. Lit.: Doctor Faustus ]
  6. Harker, Jonathan uncovers vampiric and lycanthropic activities at Castle Dracula. [Br. Lit.: Dracula ]
  7. Lots wife ignores Gods command; turns to salt upon looking back. [O.T.: Genesis 19:26]
  8. Lucius his insatiable curiosity involves him in magic and his accidental transformation into an ass. [Rom. Lit.: The Golden Ass ]
  9. Nosy Parker after a meddlesome Elizabethan Archbishop of Canterbury. [Br. Hist.: Espy, 169]
  10. Odysseus companions to determine its contents, they open the bag Aeolus had given Odysseus, thus releasing winds that blow the ship off course. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey ].
  11. Pandora inquisitively opens box of plagues given by Zeus. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 191]
  12. Pry, Paul overly inquisitive journalist. [Br. Lit.: Paul Pry ; Espy, 135]
  13. sycamore symbolizes inquisitiveness. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]
  14. Vathek journeys to Istakhar where worlds secrets are revealed. [Br. Lit.: Vathek ]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Curiosity." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. 8 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Curiosity." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 8, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity

"Curiosity." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Retrieved December 08, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

curiosity

curiosity curiosity killed the cat often used as a warning against interference in what is not your business; the saying is recorded from the early 20th century.
'satiable curiosity unquenchable desire for information; from Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories (1900), ‘There was one Elephant—an Elephant's Child—who was full of 'satiable curtiosity, and that means he asked ever so many questions.’

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"curiosity." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 8 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"curiosity." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 8, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity

"curiosity." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 08, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

curiosity

cu·ri·os·i·ty / ˌkyoŏrēˈäsitē/ • n. (pl. -ties) 1. a strong desire to know or learn something. 2. a strange or unusual object or fact.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"curiosity." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 8 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"curiosity." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 8, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity-1

"curiosity." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 08, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

curiosity

curiositybanditti, bitty, chitty, city, committee, ditty, gritty, intercity, kitty, nitty-gritty, Pitti, pity, pretty, shitty, slitty, smriti, spitty, titty, vittae, witty •fifty, fifty-fifty, nifty, shifty, swiftie, thrifty •guilty, kiltie, silty •flinty, linty, minty, shinty •ballistae, Christie, Corpus Christi, misty, twisty, wristy •sixty •deity, gaiety (US gayety), laity, simultaneity, spontaneity •contemporaneity, corporeity, femineity, heterogeneity, homogeneity •anxiety, contrariety, dubiety, impiety, impropriety, inebriety, notoriety, piety, satiety, sobriety, ubiety, variety •moiety •acuity, ambiguity, annuity, assiduity, congruity, contiguity, continuity, exiguity, fatuity, fortuity, gratuity, ingenuity, perpetuity, perspicuity, promiscuity, suety, superfluity, tenuity, vacuity •rabbity •improbity, probity •acerbity • witchetty • crotchety •heredity •acidity, acridity, aridity, avidity, cupidity, flaccidity, fluidity, frigidity, humidity, hybridity, insipidity, intrepidity, limpidity, liquidity, lividity, lucidity, morbidity, placidity, putridity, quiddity, rabidity, rancidity, rapidity, rigidity, solidity, stolidity, stupidity, tepidity, timidity, torpidity, torridity, turgidity, validity, vapidity •commodity, oddity •immodesty, modesty •crudity, nudity •fecundity, jocundity, moribundity, profundity, rotundity, rubicundity •absurdity • difficulty • gadgety •majesty • fidgety • rackety •pernickety, rickety •biscuity •banality, duality, fatality, finality, ideality, legality, locality, modality, morality, natality, orality, reality, regality, rurality, tonality, totality, venality, vitality, vocality •fidelity •ability, agility, civility, debility, docility, edibility, facility, fertility, flexility, fragility, futility, gentility, hostility, humility, imbecility, infantility, juvenility, liability, mobility, nihility, nobility, nubility, puerility, senility, servility, stability, sterility, tactility, tranquillity (US tranquility), usability, utility, versatility, viability, virility, volatility •ringlety •equality, frivolity, jollity, polity, quality •credulity, garrulity, sedulity •nullity •amity, calamity •extremity • enmity •anonymity, dimity, equanimity, magnanimity, proximity, pseudonymity, pusillanimity, unanimity •comity •conformity, deformity, enormity, multiformity, uniformity •subcommittee • pepperminty •infirmity •Christianity, humanity, inanity, profanity, sanity, urbanity, vanity •amnesty •lenity, obscenity, serenity •indemnity, solemnity •mundanity • amenity •affinity, asininity, clandestinity, divinity, femininity, infinity, masculinity, salinity, trinity, vicinity, virginity •benignity, dignity, malignity •honesty •community, immunity, importunity, impunity, opportunity, unity •confraternity, eternity, fraternity, maternity, modernity, paternity, taciturnity •serendipity, snippety •uppity •angularity, barbarity, bipolarity, charity, circularity, clarity, complementarity, familiarity, granularity, hilarity, insularity, irregularity, jocularity, linearity, parity, particularity, peculiarity, polarity, popularity, regularity, secularity, similarity, singularity, solidarity, subsidiarity, unitarity, vernacularity, vulgarity •alacrity • sacristy •ambidexterity, asperity, austerity, celerity, dexterity, ferrety, posterity, prosperity, severity, sincerity, temerity, verity •celebrity • integrity • rarity •authority, inferiority, juniority, majority, minority, priority, seniority, sonority, sorority, superiority •mediocrity • sovereignty • salubrity •entirety •futurity, immaturity, impurity, maturity, obscurity, purity, security, surety •touristy •audacity, capacity, fugacity, loquacity, mendacity, opacity, perspicacity, pertinacity, pugnacity, rapacity, sagacity, sequacity, tenacity, veracity, vivacity, voracity •laxity •sparsity, varsity •necessity •complexity, perplexity •density, immensity, propensity, tensity •scarcity • obesity •felicity, toxicity •fixity, prolixity •benedicite, nicety •anfractuosity, animosity, atrocity, bellicosity, curiosity, fabulosity, ferocity, generosity, grandiosity, impecuniosity, impetuosity, jocosity, luminosity, monstrosity, nebulosity, pomposity, ponderosity, porosity, preciosity, precocity, reciprocity, religiosity, scrupulosity, sinuosity, sumptuosity, velocity, verbosity, virtuosity, viscosity •paucity • falsity • caducity • russety •adversity, biodiversity, diversity, perversity, university •sacrosanctity, sanctity •chastity •entity, identity •quantity • certainty •cavity, concavity, depravity, gravity •travesty • suavity •brevity, levity, longevity •velvety • naivety •activity, nativity •equity •antiquity, iniquity, obliquity, ubiquity •propinquity

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"curiosity." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 8 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"curiosity." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 8, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity-0

"curiosity." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 08, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curiosity-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Curiosity

CURIOSITY

As here understood, curiosity is a culpably excessive desire to know. When the human mind is confronted with a question, it is naturally moved to make inquiry. Normally the mind does not rest until it is decided that the matter does not merit the trouble of investigation, or that investigation would be fruitless, or until adequate evidence for a judgment is obtained. Moralists consider curiosity as a vice opposed to studiousness. The subject matter for this virtue is not knowledge in itself, but rather the desire to know. This desire is capable of both excess and defect, and hence a particular virtue is required to moderate it according to the norms of right reason. To this virtue curiosity is opposed by way of excess. Though knowledge is a good thing in itself, the desire for it is immoderate and unreasonable when its pursuit involves evil motivation (e.g., pride), or an inordinate waste of time, or injustice to another (e.g., when what one seeks to know is another's rightful secret), or the use of illegitimate means (e.g., divination or traffic with evil spirits), or when the knowledge would be likely to constitute a serious occasion of sin (e.g., for ordinary people and under ordinary circumstances, knowledge of the contents of a truly pornographic book). Curiosity in its common occurrences is not a grave sin, but it can be serious by reason of circumstances, as when it leads to the unjust exploration of the secrets of others or the invasion of their privacy, or when it causes one to commit grave sin of other kinds.

Bibliography: thomas aquinas, Summa Theologiae, 2a2ae, 167. f. l. b. cunningham, ed., The Christian Life (Dubuque 1959).

[t. c. kane]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Curiosity." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 8 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Curiosity." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 8, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/curiosity

"Curiosity." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 08, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/curiosity

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.