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Daphne (in Greek mythology)

Daphne (dăf´nē), in Greek mythology, a nymph. She was loved by Apollo and by Leucippus, a mortal who disguised himself as a nymph to be near her. When Leucippus betrayed his sex while bathing, the nymphs tore him to pieces. Apollo then pursued Daphne, who prayed to Gaea for aid and was changed into a laurel tree.

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daphne (in botany)

daphne, common name for, and genus name of, certain low deciduous or evergreen shrubs native to Eurasia. In the United States several naturalized species are cultivated for their handsome foliage and fragrant flowers, e.g., D. mezereum and D. laureola, commonly called spurge-laurel and olive-spurge respectively but unrelated to the true spurge or laurel. The dried bark of D. mezereum was used medicinally, but the plant is poisonous. D. genkwa has been used in China as an effective abortifacient. Daphnes are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Myrtales, family Thymelaeaceae.

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Daphne

Daphne Nymph in Greek mythology. Apollo, struck by a gold-tipped arrow of Eros, fell in love with Daphne. She had been shot with one of Eros' leaden points, and so scorned all men. To protect her from Apollo, the gods transformed her into a laurel tree.

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Daphne

Daphne. Opera (bucolic tragedy) in 1 act by R. Strauss to lib. by Gregor. Comp. 1936–7. Prod. Dresden 1938, Santa Fe 1964, Leeds (Opera North) 1987, London (concert) 1990, Garsington 1995.

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Daphne

Daphne in Greek mythology, a nymph who was turned into a laurel bush to save her from the amorous pursuit of Apollo.

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daphne

daphneAnnie, ca'canny, canny, cranny, Danny, fanny, granny, nanny, tranny •Ariadne, Evadne •daphne •Agni, Cagney •acne, Arachne, hackney •hootenanny •Afghani, ani, Armani, Azerbaijani, Barney, biriani, blarney, Carney, frangipani, Fulani, Galvani, Giovanni, Hindustani, Killarney, maharani, Mbabane, Modigliani, Omani, Pakistani, Rafsanjani, Rajasthani, rani, sarnie •McCartney •antennae, any, Benny, blenny, Dene, fenny, jenny, Kenny, Kilkenny, Lenny, many, penne, penny, Rennie •catchpenny • pinchpenny •pyrotechny •Bahraini, brainy, Chaney, Eugénie, grainy, Janey, Khomeini, rainy, veiny, waney, zany •halfpenny, shove-halfpenny, twopenny-halfpenny •Athene, bambini, beanie, Bellini, Bernini, bikini, Boccherini, Borromini, capellini, catenae, Cellini, Cherubini, Cyrene, Fellini, fettuccine, genie, greeny, grissini, Heaney, Houdini, Jeanie, linguine, martini, Mazzini, meanie, Mussolini, Mycenae, Paganini, Panini, porcini, Puccini, queenie, Rossellini, Rossini, Santoríni, Selene, sheeny, spaghettini, Sweeney, teeny, teeny-weeny, tortellini, Toscanini, Trini, tweeny, wahine, weeny, zucchini •monokini

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