wilting

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wilting The limpness found when plant tissues contain insufficient water to hold the cells rigid. This may occur when the rate of transpiration exceeds the rate at which water is able to enter the root system from a soil containing ample water, causing temporary wilting from which the plant recovers when the transpiration rate falls. It may also be due to a deficiency of water in the soil. See also PERMANENT WILTING PERCENTAGE.

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wilting The condition that arises in plants when more water is lost by evaporation than is absorbed from the soil. This causes the cells to lose their turgor and the plant structure droops. Plants can normally recover from wilting if water is added to the soil, but permanent wilting and possible death can result if the plant does not have access to water for a long period of time. In certain plants wilting is important as a mechanism to avoid overheating: when the leaves droop they are taken out of direct contact with the sun's rays. When the sun sets the plant can begin to transpire at the normal rate and the cells of the leaves regain their turgor.

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wilting The limpness found when plant tissues contain insufficient water to hold the cells rigid. This may occur when the rate of transpiration exceeds the rate at which water is able to enter the root system from a soil containing ample water, causing temporary wilting from which the plant recovers when the transpiration rate falls. It may also be the result of a deficiency of water in the soil. See also permanent wilting percentage.