dispersal

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dispersal The tendency of an organism to move away, either from its birth site (natal dispersal) or breeding site (breeding dispersal): the opposite of philopatry. Rates of regional dispersal depend on the interaction of several factors, notably the size and shape of the source area, the dispersal ability of the organisms, and the influence of such other environmental factors as winds or ocean currents. Dispersal may be passive (e.g. of winged seeds or ballooning spiderlings), active (e.g. of many mammals), passive but involving an active agent (e.g. seeds carried on the coats of mammals), or clonal; in practice these categories are difficult to define precisely. Mathematical modelling using these factors has practical applications in the design of nature reserves, and provides an insight into the present distribution of organisms.

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dispersal The tendency of an organism to move away from either its birth site (natal dispersal) or its breeding site (breeding dispersal): the opposite of philopatry. Rates of regional dispersal depend on the interaction of several factors, notably the size and shape of the source area, the dispersal ability of the organisms, and the influence of such other environmental factors as winds or ocean currents. Dispersal may be passive (e.g. of winged seeds or ballooning spiderlings), active (e.g. of many mammals), passive but involving an active agent (e.g. seeds carried on the coats of mammals), or clonal; in practice these categories are difficult to define precisely. Mathematical modelling using these factors has practical applications in the design of nature reserves, and provides an insight into the present distribution of organisms.

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dispersal The tendency of an organism to move away, either from its birth site (natal dispersal) or breeding site (breeding dispersal): the opposite of philopatry. Rates of regional dispersal depend on the interaction of several factors, notably the size and shape of the source area, the dispersal ability of the organisms, and the influence of such other environmental factors as winds or ocean currents. Dispersal may be passive (e.g. of ballooning spiderlings), active (e.g. of many mammals), passive but involving an active agent (e.g. seeds carried on the coats of mammals), or clonal; in practice these categories are difficult to define precisely. Mathematical modelling using these factors has practical applications in the design of nature reserves, and provides an insight into the present distribution of organisms.

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dispersal The dissemination of offspring of plants or sessile animals. Dispersal provides organisms that are not mobile with a better chance of survival by reducing competition among offspring and parents. It also promotes the colonization of new habitats. Flowering plants produce fruits or seeds that are dispersed by such agents as wind, water, or animals. Specialized structures have evolved in many species to aid dispersal (see fruit).