Skip to main content
Select Source:

anaerobic

anaerobic Applying to metabolism in the cells of the body, or to micro-organisms, this means functioning without oxygen. Examples include anaerobic glycolysis: the pathway of hexose breakdown from glucose 6-phosphate to lactate in muscle, and the main component of the metabolism of red blood cells, which have no mitochondria. Anaerobic bacteria inhabit the lower part of the intestines. Applying to exercise: more intense than can be maintained in balance with oxygen intake, aerobic pathways being insufficient to supply energy at the required rate (though they always contribute as well) — as in a 200-metre sprint.

Neil C. Spurway


See exercise; lactate threshold; metabolism.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"anaerobic." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaerobic." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anaerobic

"anaerobic." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Retrieved July 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anaerobic

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

anaerobic

anaerobic Connected with the absence of oxygen or air, or not dependent on oxygen or air for survival. An anaerobic organism (anaerobe), such as a bacterium or yeast, is a microorganism that can survive by releasing energy from glucose and other foods in the absence of oxygen. The process by which it does so is called anaerobic respiration. It differs from aerobic respiration, in which an organism must have oxygen to release energy. Most anaerobes can survive in oxygen but do not need it for respiration.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"anaerobic." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaerobic." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anaerobic

"anaerobic." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved July 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anaerobic

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

anaerobic

anaerobic
1. Of an environment: one in which air (oxygen) is absent. In the case of a depositional environment, one with 0.0–0.1 ml of dissolved oxygen per litre of water. Compare AEROBIC; and DYSAEROBIC.

2. Of an organism: one able to grow only in the absence of oxygen, i.e. an anaerobe.

2. Of a process: one that can occur only in the absence of oxygen.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved July 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

anaerobic

anaerobic
1. Of an environment: one in which oxygen is absent.

2. Of an organism: one able to exist only in the absence of oxygen, i.e. an anaerobe. Organisms may be facultative anaerobes (e.g. yeasts) or obligatory anaerobes (e.g. sulphur bacteria).

3. Of a process: one that can occur only in the absence of oxygen.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic-2

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved July 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic-2

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

anaerobic

anaerobic
1. Of an environment: one in which oxygen is absent.

2. Of an organism: one able to exist only in the absence of oxygen, i.e. an anaerobe. Organisms may be facultative anaerobes (e.g. yeasts) or obligatory anaerobes (e.g. sulphur bacteria).

3. Of a process: one that can occur only in the absence of oxygen.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic-0

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved July 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

anaerobic

anaerobic
1. Of an environment: one in which air (oxygen) is absent.

2. Of an organism: one able to grow only in the absence of oxygen, i.e. an anaerobe.

3. Of a process: one that can occur only in the absence of oxygen.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic-1

"anaerobic." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved July 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaerobic-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.