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Rockas, Leo 1928–

Rockas, Leo 1928–

PERSONAL:

Born October 12, 1928, in Rochester, NY; son of John Constantine and Crystal Rockas; married Virginia Rouvina, June 25, 1960; children: Nia, Anastasia. Ethnicity: "Greek." Education: Attended State University of New York College at Brockport, 1945-46; University of Rochester, A.B. (with honors), 1951, A.M., 1952; University of Michigan, Ph.D., 1960.

ADDRESSES:

Home—West Simsbury, CT.

CAREER:

Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, instructor in English, 1957-61; Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, assistant professor of English, 1960-61; State University of New York College at Geneseo, Geneseo, began as assistant professor, became professor of English language and literature, 1961-67; Briarcliff College, Briarcliff Manor, NY, began as associate professor, became professor of English, 1967-71; University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT, began as associate professor, became professor of English 1971-2000. Military service: U.S. Army, 1946-48.

MEMBER:

Phi Beta Kappa.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Avery Hopwood Award, essay division, University of Michigan, 1956; summer fellow, Yaddo, 1957.

WRITINGS:

Modes of Rhetoric, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1964.

Ways In: Analyzing and Responding to Literature, Boynton/Cook (Montclair, NJ), 1983.

A Creative Copybook, Heath (Lexington, MA), 1988.

Style in Writing: A Prose Reader, Heath (Lexington, MA), 1992.

Mice Make War (novel), PublishAmerica (Frederick, MD), 2007.

Contributor to books, including What Makes Writing Good: A Multiperspective, edited by William Coles, Jr., and James Vopat, Heath (Lexington, MA), 1985. Contributor to professional journals, including Exquisite Corpse, New England Quarterly, College English, Dalhousie Review, Composition and Teaching, English Literary History, and Bucknell Review.

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