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Branciforte, Suzanne 1961-

BRANCIFORTE, Suzanne 1961-


PERSONAL: Born January 22, 1961, in NY; daughter of John (a teacher) and Theresa (a teacher; maiden name, Orlacchio) Branciforte; married Adrian Hernandez, August 30, 1987 (divorced, October, 1995); children: Maximillian Branciforte. Ethnicity: "Italian-American." Education: Harvard University, B.A. (cum laude), 1982; University of California, Los Angeles, M.A., 1986, Ph.D., 1990. Hobbies and other interests: Music (piano, classical, voice, jazz).


ADDRESSES: Home—Via Aurelia 51/2, Bogliasco GE 16031, Italy. E-mail—[email protected]


CAREER: University of California, Los Angeles, teacher, 1984-87; College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, assistant professor of modern languages and literature and coordinator of Italian section, 1990-97; University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, professor, 1998—, professor at Acqui Terme campus, 1998-99. Università per Stranieri, professor, 2000—; teacher of classes in Florence, Italy, for Miami Dade Community College, 1989, University of Michigan, 1989-90, and Florida State University and Stanford University, 1990; lecturer at other institutions, including University of Naples, Smith College, Wheaton College, Harvard University, and Johns Hopkins University.


MEMBER: Modern Language Association of America, American Italian Historical Association, American Association for Italian Studies.


AWARDS, HONORS: Fulbright scholar, 1987-88.

WRITINGS:


Parliamo italiano! with laboratory manual and instructor's resource manual, Houghton (Boston, MA), 1998, second edition 2002.

(Translator) Renata Viganò, Partisan Wedding: Stories, University of Missouri Press (Columbia, MO), 1999.

Contributor to books, including John Davis, editor, Italy and America, 1943-44, Città del Sole (Naples, Italy), 1997. Contributor to videotapes, include Memoria della liberazione, liberazione della memoria, 1995, and Speaking History: Americans in Italy, 1943-45, 1995. Contributor of articles and reviews to periodicals, including Comitatus: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Italian Studies, and Italianist.

ADAPTATIONS: Parliamo Italiano! was produced as a videotape.


WORK IN PROGRESS: A textbook of Italian for adolescents; literary translations; research on World War II in Italy and on Italian-American identity.

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