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smack

smack1 / smak/ • n. a sharp slap or blow, typically one given with the palm of the hand: she gave Mark a smack across the face. ∎  a loud, sharp sound made by such a blow or a similar action: she closed the ledger with a smack. ∎  a loud kiss: I was saluted with two hearty smacks on my cheeks. • v. [tr.] strike (someone or something), typically with the palm of the hand and as a punishment: Jessica smacked his face quite hard. ∎  [tr.] smash, drive, or put forcefully into or onto something: he smacked a fist into the palm of a black-gloved hand. ∎  part (one's lips) noisily in eager anticipation or enjoyment of food, drink, or other pleasures. ∎ archaic crack (a whip). • adv. inf. 1. in a sudden and violent way: I ran smack into the back of a parked truck. 2. exactly; precisely: our mother's house was smack in the middle of the city. smack2 • v. [intr.] (smack of) have a flavor of; taste of: the tea smacked of peppermint. ∎  suggest the presence or effects of (something wrong or unpleasant): the whole thing smacks of a cover-up. • n. (a smack of) a flavor or taste of: anything with even a modest smack of hops dries the palate. ∎  a trace or suggestion of: I hear the smack of collusion between them. smack3 • n. a fishing boat, often one equipped with a well for keeping the caught fish alive. smack4 • n. inf. heroin.

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smack

smack2 separate the lips with a sharp noise XVI; crack (a whip) XVII; strike sharply with a flat surface XIX. — MLG., MDu. smacken (LG., Du. smakken); cf. OE. ġesmacian pat, caress, G. schmatzen eat or kiss noisily; of imit. orig.
So sb. XVI.

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smack

smack1 taste, flavour OE.; (fig.) trace, tinge, ‘touch’ XVI. OE. smæc = MLG., MDu. smak (Du. smaak), OHG. gismac (G. geschmack).
Hence vb. taste XIV, savour of XVI.

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Smack

Smack

a smattering; a taste; a small quantity.

Examples : smack of jellyfishLipton, 1970; of knowledge; of my muse, 1766; of every sort of wine, 1759; of wit.

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smack

smack3 light single-masted sailing-vessel. XVII. — LG., Du. smacke (mod. smak); of unkn. orig.

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smack

smackaback, alack, attack, back, black, brack, clack, claque, crack, Dirac, drack, flack, flak, hack, jack, Kazakh, knack, lack, lakh, mac, mach, Nagorno-Karabakh, pack, pitchblack, plaque, quack, rack, sac, sack, shack, shellac, slack, smack, snack, stack, tach, tack, thwack, track, vac, wack, whack, wrack, yak, Zack •cardiac • zodiac •haemophiliac (US hemophiliac), necrophiliac, sacroiliac •umiak •bibliomaniac, dipsomaniac, egomaniac, kleptomaniac, maniac, megalomaniac, monomaniac, nymphomaniac, pyromaniac •insomniac • celeriac • Syriac •hypochondriac • Mauriac • theriac •amnesiac •aphrodisiac, Dionysiac •Dayak, kayak •Kerouac • bivouac

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