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regular

reg·u·lar / ˈregyələr; ˈreg(ə)lər/ • adj. 1. arranged in or constituting a constant or definite pattern, esp. with the same space between individual instances: place the flags at regular intervals a regular arrangement. ∎  happening in such a pattern with the same time between individual instances; recurring at short uniform intervals: a regular monthly check her breathing became deeper, more regular. ∎  (of a person) doing the same thing or going to the same place with the same time between individual instances: regular worshipers. ∎  (of a structure or arrangement) arranged in or constituting a symmetrical or harmonious pattern: beautifully regular, heart-shaped leaves. ∎  (of a person) defecating or menstruating at predictable times. 2. done or happening frequently: regular border clashes parties were a fairly regular occurrence. ∎  (of a person) doing the same thing or going to the same place frequently: a regular visitor. 3. conforming to or governed by an accepted standard of procedure or convention: policies carried on by his deputies through regular channels. ∎  of or belonging to the permanent professional armed forces of a country: a regular soldier. ∎  (of a person) properly trained or qualified and pursuing a full-time occupation: a strong distrust of regular doctors. ∎  Christian Church subject to or bound by religious rule; belonging to a religious or monastic order: the regular clergy.Contrasted with secular (sense 2). ∎ inf. rightly so called; complete; absolute (used for emphasis): this place is a regular fisherman's paradise. 4. used, done, or happening on a habitual basis; usual; customary: I couldn't get an appointment with my regular barber our regular suppliers. ∎  of a normal or ordinary kind; not special: it's richer than regular pasta. ∎  (chiefly in commercial use) denoting merchandise, esp. food or clothing, of average, medium, or standard size: a shake and regular fries. ∎  (of a person) not pretentious or arrogant; ordinary and friendly: advertising agencies who try to portray their candidates as regular guys. ∎  (of coffee) of a specified type, such as caffeinated, or prepared in a specified way, such as black or with cream: one regular coffee and three decafs. ∎  (in surfing and other board sports) with the left leg in front of the right on the board. 5. Gram. (of a word) following the normal pattern of inflection: a regular verb. 6. Geom. (of a figure) having all sides and all angles equal: a regular polygon. ∎  (of a solid) bounded by a number of equal figures. 7. Bot. (of a flower) having radial symmetry. • n. a regular customer or member, for example of a bar, store, or team: attracting a richer clientele as its regulars. ∎  a regular member of the armed forces. ∎  a member of a political party who is faithful to that party: he plans to sell tickets to the big-money party regulars. ∎  Christian Church one of the regular clergy. PHRASES: keep regular hours do the same thing, esp. going to bed and getting up, at the same time each day.DERIVATIVES: reg·u·lar·ly adv.

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"regular." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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REGULAR

REGULAR. A term in general use and in LINGUISTICS for items and aspects of language that conform to general RULES. A regular verb in English has four forms, and the construction of three of those forms is predictable from the first (uninflected) form: play, plays, playing, played. On the other hand speak is an IRREGULAR verb. It has five forms, the last two of which are unpredictable: speak, speaks, speaking, spoke, spoken. See ANALOGY.

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regular

regular †subject to a religious rule XIV; conforming to a rule, principle, or standard XVI. ME. reguler (later with ending assim. to L.) — OF. reguler (mod. régulier) — L. rēgulāris, f. rēgula RULE; see -AR.
So regularize XVII (once; thereafter not before XIX). regulate (-ATE3) control, adjust. XVII. f. pp. stem of late L. rēgulāre. Hence regulation, regulator XVII.

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Regular

REGULAR

Customary; usual; with no unexpected or unusual variations; in conformity with ordinary practice.

An individual's regular course of business, for example, is the occupation in which that person is normally engaged to gain a livelihood.

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regular

regularampulla, bulla, fuller, Müller, pula, puller •titular • Weissmuller • wirepuller •incunabula, tabular •preambular • glandular • coagula •angular, quadrangular, rectangular, triangular •Dracula, facula, oracular, spectacular, vernacular •cardiovascular, vascular •annular, granular •scapula • capsular • spatula •tarantula • nebula • scheduler •calendula •irregular, regular •Benbecula, molecular, secular, specular •cellular • fibula • Caligula • singular •auricular, curricula, curricular, diverticula, funicular, lenticular, navicular, particular, perpendicular, testicular, vehicular, vermicular •primula •insular, peninsula •fistula, Vistula •globular •modular, nodular •binocular, jocular, ocular •oscular •copula, popular •consular • formula • tubular • uvula •jugular •avuncular, carbuncular •crepuscular, majuscular, minuscular, muscular •pustular •circular, semicircular, tubercular •Ursula

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