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occupy

oc·cu·py / ˈäkyəˌpī/ • v. (-pies, -pied) [tr.] 1. reside or have one's place of business in (a building): the apartment she occupies in Manhattan. ∎  fill or take up (a space or time): two long windows occupied almost the whole wall. ∎  be situated in or at (a place or position in a system or hierarchy): on the corporate ladder, they occupy the lowest rungs. ∎  hold (a position or job). 2. (often be occupied with/in) fill or preoccupy (the mind or thoughts): her mind was occupied with alarming questions. ∎  keep (someone) busy and active: Sarah occupied herself taking the coffee cups over to the sink | [as adj.] (occupied) tasks that kept her occupied for the remainder of the afternoon. 3. take control of (a place, esp. a country) by military conquest or settlement: Syria was occupied by France under a League of Nations mandate. ∎  enter, take control of, and stay in (a building) illegally and often forcibly, esp. as a form of protest: the workers occupied the factory. DERIVATIVES: oc·cu·pi·er / -ˌpīər/ n. ORIGIN: Middle English: formed irregularly from Old French occuper, from Latin occupare ‘seize.’ A now obsolete vulgar sense ‘have sexual relations with’ seems to have led to the general avoidance of the word in the 17th and most of the 18th cent.

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occupy

occupy †take possession of; have in one's possession; take up, use up; employ, engage XIV; †lay out, invest XVI. — AN. *occupier for (O)F. occuper — L. occupāre seize, f. OC- + cap- of capere take, seize.
So occupant XVI, occupier, occupation XIV.

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"occupy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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occupy

occupy •magpie • Philippi • sweetie-pie •occupy

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