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qualification

qual·i·fi·ca·tion / ˌkwäləfəˈkāshən/ • n. 1. a quality or accomplishment that makes someone suitable for a particular job or activity: only one qualification required—fabulous sense of humor. ∎  the action or fact of becoming qualified as a practitioner of a particular profession or activity: an opportunity for student teachers to share experiences before qualification. ∎  a condition that must be fulfilled before a right can be acquired; an official requirement: the five-year residency qualification for presidential candidates. 2. the action or fact of qualifying or being eligible for something: they need to beat Poland to ensure qualification for the World Cup finals. 3. a statement or assertion that makes another less absolute: this important qualification needs to be remembered when interpreting the results | he renounced without qualification all forms of terrorism. 4. Gram. the attribution of a quality to a word, esp. a noun.DERIVATIVES: qual·i·fi·ca·to·ry / ˈkwäləfikəˌtôrē/ adj.

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Qualification

QUALIFICATION

A particular attribute, quality, property, or possession that an individual must have in order to be eligible to fill an office or perform a public duty or function.

For example, attaining the age of majority is a qualification that must be met before an individual has the capacity to enter into a contract.

The term qualification also refers to a limitation or restriction that narrows the scope of language (such as that contained in a statute) that would otherwise carry a broader meaning.

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