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override

o·ver·ride • v. / ˌōvərˈrīd/ (past -rode; past part. -rid·den) [tr.] 1. use one's authority to reject or cancel (a decision, view, etc.): the legislature's insistence on overriding his budget vetoes. ∎  interrupt the action of (an automatic device), typically in order to take manual control: you can override the cutout by releasing the switch. ∎  be more important than: this commitment should override all other considerations. 2. technical extend over; overlap: the external rendering should not override the vapor barrier. 3. travel or move over (a place or thing): part of the deposit was overridden and covered by the advancing ice. • n. / ˈōvərˌrīd/ 1. a device for suspending an automatic function on a machine. ∎  the action or process of suspending an automatic function. 2. an excess or increase on a budget, salary, or cost. ∎  a commission paid to a manager on sales made by a subordinate or representative. 3. a cancellation of a decision by exertion of authority or winning of votes: the House vote in favor of the bill was ten votes short of the requisite majority for an override.

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Override

OVERRIDE

An arrangement whereby commissions are made by sales managers based upon the sales made by their subordinate sales representatives. A term found in an agreement between a real estate agent and a property owner whereby the agent keeps the right to receive a commission for the sale of the property for a reasonable time after the agreement expires if the sale is made to a purchaser with whom the agent negotiated prior to the expiration of the agreement.

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