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dissolve

dis·solve / diˈzälv/ • v. 1. [intr.] (of a solid) become incorporated into a liquid so as to form a solution: glucose dissolves easily in water. ∎  [tr.] cause (a solid) to become incorporated into a liquid in this way: dissolve a bouillon cube in a pint of hot water. ∎  (of something abstract, esp. a feeling) disappear: my courage dissolved. ∎  deteriorate or degenerate: the community policy could dissolve into chaos. ∎  subside uncontrollably into (an expression of strong feelings): she suddenly dissolved into floods of tears. ∎  (in a movie) change gradually to (a different scene or picture): dissolve to side view, looking down the street. 2. [tr.] close down or dismiss (an assembly or official body): the country's president can dissolve parliament under certain circumstances. ∎  annul or put an end to (a partnership or marriage): it only takes 28 days to dissolve a domestic partnership. • n. (in a film) an act or instance of moving gradually from one picture to another. DERIVATIVES: dis·solv·a·ble adj. dis·solv·er n.

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Dissolve

DISSOLVE

To terminate; abrogate; cancel; annul; disintegrate. To release or unloose the binding force of anything.

The dissolution of something is the act of disorganizing or disuniting it, as in marriage, contracts, or corporations.

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dissolve

dissolve loosen the parts of, spec. †melt, fuse, (now) diffuse in liquid; release from life, esp. pass.; undo (†a knot, bond, union) XIV; intr. XV.- L. dissolvere, f. DIS- 1 + solvere loosen, SOLVE.

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