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dispute

dis·pute / disˈpyoōt/ • n. a disagreement, argument, or debate: a territorial dispute between the two countries the question in dispute is altogether insignificant. ∎  a disagreement between management and employees that leads to an action of protest by the employees: if this dispute cannot be resolved quickly, a formal strike is inevitable. • v. [tr.] argue about (something); discuss heatedly: I disputed the charge on the bill | [intr.] he taught and disputed with local poets. ∎  question whether (a statement or alleged fact) is true or valid: the accusations are not disputed | the estate disputes that it is responsible for the embankment. ∎  compete for; strive to win: the two drivers crashed while disputing the lead. ∎ archaic resist (a landing or advance): the Sudanese chose Teb as the ground upon which to dispute the advance. PHRASES: beyond dispute certain or certainly; without doubt: the main part of his argument was beyond dispute. open to dispute not definitely decided: such estimates are always open to dispute.DERIVATIVES: dis·pu·tant / -ˈpyoōtnt/ n. dis·put·er n.

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Dispute

DISPUTE

A conflict or controversy; a conflict of claims or rights; an assertion of a right, claim, or demand on one side, met by contrary claims or allegations on the other. The subject of litigation; the matter for which a suit is brought and upon which issue is joined, and in relation to which jurors are called and witnesses examined.

A labor dispute is any disagreement between an employer and his or her employees concerning anything job-related, such as tenure, hours, wages, fringe benefits, and employment conditions.

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dispute

dispute debate or discourse argumentatively XIII; debate upon XIV; argue against, contest XVI. — (O)F. disputer — L. disputāre argue, debate, f. DIS- 1 + putāre reckon, consider.
Hence as sb. XVII. So disputation XIV, disputant XVII.

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dispute

disputeacute, argute, astute, beaut, Beirut, boot, bruit, brut, brute, Bute, butte, Canute, cheroot, chute, commute, compute, confute, coot, cute, depute, dilute, dispute, flute, fruit, galoot, hoot, impute, jute, loot, lute, minute, moot, mute, newt, outshoot, permute, pollute, pursuit, recruit, refute, repute, root, route, salute, Salyut, scoot, shoot, Shute, sloot, snoot, subacute, suit, telecommute, Tonton Macoute, toot, transmute, undershoot, uproot, Ute, volute •Paiute • jackboot • freeboot • top boot •snow boot • gumboot • marabout •statute • bandicoot • Hakluyt •archlute • absolute • dissolute •irresolute, resolute •jackfruit • passion fruit • breadfruit •grapefruit • snakeroot • beetroot •arrowroot • autoroute

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