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claim

claim / klām/ • v. [tr.] state or assert that something is the case, typically without providing evidence or proof: he claimed that he came from a wealthy, educated family. ∎  assert that one has gained or achieved (something): his supporters claimed victory in the presidential elections. ∎  formally request or demand; say that one owns or has earned (something): if no one claims the items, they will become government property. ∎  make a demand for (money) under the terms of an insurance policy. ∎  call for (someone's notice and thought): a most unwelcome event claimed his attention. ∎  cause the loss of (someone's life). • n. 1. an assertion of the truth of something, typically one that is disputed or in doubt: he was dogged by the claim that he had CIA links. 2. a demand or request for something considered one's due: the court had denied their claims to asylum. ∎  an application for compensation under the terms of an insurance policy. ∎  a right or title to something: they have first claim on the assets of the trust. ∎  (also mining claim) a piece of land allotted to or taken by someone in order to be mined. PHRASES: claim to fame a reason for being regarded as unusual or noteworthy: his claim to fame was bringing Garbo to Hollywood.DERIVATIVES: claim·a·ble adj.

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Claim

CLAIM

To demand or assert as a right. Facts that combine to give rise to a legally enforceable right or judicial action. Demand for relief.

A claim is something that one party owes another. Someone may make a legal claim for money, or property, or for social security benefits.

A claim also means an interest in, as in a possessory claim, or right to possession, or a claim of title to land.

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claim

claim vb. XIII. — OF. claim-, tonic stem of clamer cry, call, appeal :- L. clāmāre cry, call, proclaim, rel. to clārus CLEAR.
So claim sb. XIII. Hence claimant XVIII; primarily a legal term, after appellant, defendant.

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claim

claimacclaim, aflame, aim, became, blame, came, claim, dame, exclaim, fame, flame, frame, game, lame, maim, misname, name, proclaim, same, shame, tame •endgame • counterclaim • nickname •byname • filename • forename •surname • airframe • mainframe •Ephraim • doorframe • subframe •underframe • aspartame

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