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negative

neg·a·tive / ˈnegətiv/ • adj. 1. consisting in or characterized by the absence rather than the presence of distinguishing features. ∎  (of a statement or decision) expressing or implying denial, disagreement, or refusal: that, I take it, was a negative answer. ∎  (of the results of a test or experiment) indicating that a certain substance is not present or a certain condition does not exist: so far all the patients have tested negative for TB. ∎  [in comb.] (of a person or their blood) not having a specified substance or condition: HIV-negative. ∎  (of a person, attitude, or situation) not optimistic; harmful or unwelcome: the new tax was having a very negative effect on car sales | not all the news is negative. ∎ inf. denoting a complete lack of something: they were described as having negative vulnerability to water entry. ∎  Gram. & Logic (of a word, clause, or proposition) expressing denial, negation, or refutation; stating or asserting that something is not the case. Contrasted with affirmative and interrogative. 2. (of a quantity) less than zero; to be subtracted from others or from zero. ∎  denoting a direction of decrease or reversal: the industry suffered negative growth in 1992. 3. of, containing, producing, or denoting the kind of electric charge carried by electrons. 4. (of a photographic image) showing light and shade or colors reversed from those of the original. 5. Astrol. relating to or denoting any of the earth or water signs, considered passive in nature. • n. 1. a word or statement that expresses denial, disagreement, or refusal: she replied in the negative. ∎  (often the negative) a bad, unwelcome, or unpleasant quality, characteristic, or aspect of a situation or person: confidence will not be instilled by harping solely on the negative | the bus trip and the positive media have not had time to turn his significant negatives around. ∎  Gram. a word, affix, or phrase expressing negation. ∎  Logic another term for negation. 2. a photographic image made on film or specially prepared glass that shows the light and shade or color values reversed from the original, and from which positive prints can be made. 3. a result of a test or experiment indicating that a certain substance is not present or a certain condition does not exist: the percentage of false negatives generated by a cancer test was of great concern. 4. the part of an electric circuit that is at a lower electrical potential than another part designated as having zero electrical potential. 5. a number less than zero. • interj. no (usually used in a military context): “Any snags, Captain?” “Negative, she's running like clockwork.” • v. [tr.] 1. reject; refuse to accept; veto: the bill was negatived by 130 votes to 129. ∎  disprove; contradict: the insurer's main arguments were negatived by Lawrence. 2. render ineffective; neutralize: should criminal law allow consent to negative what would otherwise be a crime? DERIVATIVES: neg·a·tive·ly adv. neg·a·tive·ness n. neg·a·tiv·i·ty / ˌnegəˈtivitē/ n.

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"negative." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"negative." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/negative

"negative." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/negative

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negative

negative: see photographic processing.

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"negative." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Negative

Negative

Negative is a term in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and other sciences, which usually means opposite of positive or less than zero. An electrons charge is called negative, not because it is below, but because it is opposite that of a proton. A surface with negative curvature bulges in from the point of view of someone on one side of the surface but bulges out from the point of view of someone on the other side. A line with negative slope is downhill for someone moving to the right but uphill for someone moving to the left.

The term negative is most commonly applied to numbers. When negative is an adjective applied to a number or integer, the reference is to the opposite of a positive number. As a noun, negative is the opposite of any given number. Thus, -4, -3/5, and - 2 are all negative numbers, but the negative of - 4 is + 4. The integers, for example, are often defined as the natural numbers, plus their negatives and zero. Sometimes the word opposite is used to mean the same as the noun negative.

Technically, negative numbers are the opposites with respect to addition. If a is a positive number, then -a is a negative number because: a + (-a) = 0.

Allowing numbers and other mathematical elements to be negative as well as positive greatly expands the generality and usefulness of the mathematical systems of which they are a part. For example, if one owes a credit card company $150 and mistakenly sends $160 in payment, the company automatically subtracts the payment from the balance due, leaving -$10 as the balance due. It does not have to set up a separate column in its ledger or on its statements. A balance due of -$10 is mathematically equivalent to a credit of $10.

When the Fahrenheit temperature scale was developed, the starting point was chosen to be the coldest temperature which, at that time, could be achieved in the laboratory. This was the temperature of a mixture of equal weights of ice and salt. Because the scale could be extended downward through the use of negative numbers, it could be used to measure temperatures all the way down to absolute zero.

The idea of negative numbers is readily grasped, even by young children. They usually do not raise objection to extending a number line beyond zero. They play games that can leave a player in the hole. Nevertheless, for centuries European mathematicians resisted using negative numbers. If solving an equation led to a negative root, it would be dismissed as without meaning.

In other parts of the world, however, negative numbers were used. The Chinese used two abaci, a black one for positive numbers and a red one for negative numbers, as early as two thousand years ago. Brahmagupta, the Indian mathematician who lived in the seventh century, not only acknowledged negative roots of quadratic equations, he gave rules for multiplying various combinations of positive and negative numbers. It was several centuries before European mathematicians became aware of the work of Brahmagupta and others, and began to treat negative numbers as meaningful. Even in the eighteen century, mathematicians like Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler (17071783) thought that negative numbers had values greater than infinity.

Negative numbers can be symbolized in several ways. The most common is to use a minus sign in front of the number. Occasionally the minus sign is placed behind the number, or the number is enclosed in parentheses. Children, playing a game, will often draw a circle around a number that is in the hole. When a minus sign appears in front of a letter representing a number, as in -x, the number may be positive or negative depending on the value of x itself. To guarantee that a number is positive, one can put absolute value signs around it, for example ǀ-xǀ. The absolute value sign can also guarantee a negative value, which is -ǀxǀ.

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"Negative." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Negative." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/negative-0

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Negative

Negative

Negative is a term in mathematics that usually means "opposite." An electron's charge is called negative not because it is "below" but because it is opposite that of a proton . A surface with negative curvature bulges in from the point of view of someone on one side of the surface but bulges out from the point of view of someone on the other side. A line with negative slope is downhill for someone moving to the right but uphill for someone moving to the left.

The term negative is most commonly applied to numbers. When negative is an adjective applied to a number or integer, the reference is to the opposite of a positive number . As a noun, negative is the opposite of any given number. Thus, -4, -3/5, and - √ 2 are all negative numbers, but the negative of -4 is +4. The integers , for example, are often defined as the natural numbers plus their negatives plus zero . Sometimes the word opposite is used to mean the same as the noun negative.

Technically, negative numbers are the opposites with respect to addition. If a is a positive number then -a is a negative number because: a + (-a) = 0.

Allowing numbers and other mathematical elements to be negative as well as positive greatly expands the generality and usefulness of the mathematical systems of which they are a part. For example, if one owes a credit card company $150 and mistakenly sends $160 in payment, the company automatically subtracts the payment from the balance due, leaving -$10 as the balance due. It does not have to set up a separate column in its ledger or on its statements. A balance due of -$10 is mathematically equivalent to a credit of $10.

When the Fahrenheit temperature scale was developed, the starting point was chosen to be the coldest temperature which, at that time , could be achieved in the laboratory. This was the temperature of a mixture of equal weights of ice and salt . Because the scale could be extended downward through the use of negative numbers, it could be used to measure temperatures all the way down to absolute zero .

The idea of negative numbers is readily grasped, even by young children. They usually do not raise objection to extending a number line beyond zero. They play games that can leave a player "in the hole." Nevertheless, for centuries European mathematicians resisted using negative numbers. If solving an equation led to a negative root, it would be dismissed as without meaning.

In other parts of the world, however, negative numbers were used. The Chinese used two abaci, a black one for positive numbers and a red one for negative numbers, as early as two thousand years ago. Brahmagupta, the Indian mathematician who lived in the seventh century, not only acknowledged negative roots of quadratic equations, he gave rules for multiplying various combinations of positive and negative numbers. It was several centuries before Euopean mathematicians became aware of the work of Brahmagupta and others, and began to treat negative numbers as meaninful.

Negative numbers can be symbolized in several ways. The most common is to use a minus sign in front of the number. Occasionally the minus sign is placed behind the number, or the number is enclosed in parentheses. Children, playing a game, will often draw a circle around a number which is "in the hole." When a minus sign appears in front of a letter representing a number, as in -x, the number may be positive or negative depending on the value of x itself. To guarantee that a number is positive, one can put absolute value signs around it, for example |-x|. The absolute value sign can also guarantee a negative value, which is -|x|.

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"Negative." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Negative." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/negative

"Negative." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/negative

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American Psychological Association

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Notes:
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  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.