marsh

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marsh / märsh/ • n. an area of low-lying land that is flooded in wet seasons or at high tide, and typically remains waterlogged at all times. DERIVATIVES: marsh·i·ness / ˈmärshēnis/ n. marsh·y adj. ORIGIN: Old English mer(i)sc (perhaps influenced by late Latin mariscus ‘marsh’), of West Germanic origin.

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marsh A more or less permanently wet area of mineral soil, as opposed to a peaty area, e.g. around the edges of a lake, or on an undrained flood-plain of a river. Colloquially, ‘marsh’ is often used interchangeably with ‘swamp’ and ‘bog’.

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marsh A more or less permanently wet area of mineral soil, as opposed to a peaty area, e.g. around the edges of a lake or on a flood-plain of a river. Colloquially, ‘marsh’ is often used interchangeably with swamp and bog.

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marsh Flat, wetland area, devoid of peat, saturated by moisture during one or more seasons. Typical vegetation includes grasses, sedges, reeds and rushes. Marshes are valuable wetlands and maintain water tables in adjacent ecosystems. Unlike Bogs, they have alkaline not acidic soil. See also swamp

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marsh OE. mer(i)sċ = MLG. mersch, marsch, MDu. mersch(e) (whence G. marsch, Du. marsk):- WGmc. *marisk-, whence medL. mariscus, the source of (O)F. marais, † mareis, adopted in ME. as mar(r)eis, mar(r)ais (XIV), alt. later to marish (XVI).
Hence marshy (see -Y1) XIV.

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marsh A more or less permanently wet area of mineral soil (as opposed to a peaty area), typically found around the edges of a lake or on an undrained river flood-plain. Colloquially, ‘marsh’ is often used interchangeably with ‘swamp’ and ‘bog’.

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marshdémarche, gouache, harsh, marsh, moustache (US mustache) •Saltmarsh

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marsh: see swamp.