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recapitulation

recapitulation, theory, stated as the biogenetic law by E. H. Haeckel, that the embryological development of the individual repeats the stages in the evolutionary development of the species. For example, the beginnings of gill clefts appear in both humans and fish, but while they are elaborated and eventually function in the fish, in humans, except for the modified gill cleft that becomes the Eustachian tube, they disappear as the embryo develops. Though drastically modified and qualified since its proposal, the historical significance of this theory— "ontogenesis recapitulates phylogenesis" —is that with its appearance it lent support to the theory of evolution by seeming to corroborate it.

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recapitulation

re·ca·pit·u·la·tion / ˌrēkəˌpichəˈlāshən/ • n. an act or instance of summarizing and restating the main points of something: his recapitulation of the argument. ∎  Biol. the repetition of an evolutionary or other process during development or growth. ∎  Mus. a part of a movement (esp. one in sonata form) in which themes from the exposition are restated.

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Recapitulation

Recapitulation (Lat. recapitulatio; Gk., anakephalaiōsis, ‘summing up, summary’). In the writings of the Christian fathers, the restoration of fallen humanity to communion with God through the obedience of Christ. The concept derives from Ephesians 1. 10, where God is said to sum up all things in Christ, and was first elaborated by Irenaeus.

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recapitulation

recapitulation The theory that some stages of evolution are repeated in the development of an individual organism, i.e. that phylogeny is repeated in ontogeny. It was proposed by Ernst Haeckel. See also acceleration.

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recapitulation

recapitulation. That section of a comp. in sonata form and its variants in which the themes, or some of them, presented in the exposition are repeated, more or less in their orig. form.

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