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papaya

papaya (pəpī´ə), soft-stemmed tree (Carica papaya) of tropical America resembling a palm with a crown of palmately lobed leaves. It is cultivated for its melonlike yellow fruits eaten raw or cooked and, more recently, for the juice which has become a commercial item. The juice contains the enzyme papain, somewhat similar to pepsin and digestant in action; the enzyme is used in commercial meat tenderizers. The papaya is also called melon tree and pawpaw. In the Caribbean area the fruit is called fruta bomba. Several other Andean species, as well as the genus Jacartia, also have edible fruits. The papaya is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Violales, family Caricaceae.

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papaya

pa·pa·ya / pəˈpīyə/ • n. 1. a tropical fruit shaped like an elongated melon, with edible orange flesh and small black seeds. Also called papaw or pawpaw. 2. (also papaya tree) the fast-growing tree (Carica papaya, family Caricaceae) that bears this fruit, native to warm regions of America.

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papaya

papaya (pawpaw) Palm-like tree widely cultivated in tropical America for its fleshy, melon-like, edible fruit. It also produces the enzyme papain, which breaks down proteins, and is used commercially for a variety of purposes. Height: to 6m (20ft). Family Caricaceae; species Carica papaya.

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papaya

papaya See pawpaw.

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papaya

papaya See CARICA.

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papaya

papayaacquire, admire, afire, applier, aspire, attire, ayah, backfire, barbwire, bemire, briar, buyer, byre, choir, conspire, crier, cryer, defier, denier, desire, dire, drier, dryer, dyer, enquire, entire, esquire, expire, fire, flyer, friar, fryer, Gaia, gyre, hellfire, hire, hiya, ire, Isaiah, jambalaya, Jeremiah, Josiah, Kintyre, latria, liar, lyre, Maia, Maya, Mayer, messiah, mire, misfire, Nehemiah, Obadiah, papaya, pariah, peripeteia, perspire, playa, Praia, prior, pyre, quire, replier, scryer, shire, shyer, sire, skyer, Sophia, spire, squire, supplier, Surabaya, suspire, tier, tire, transpire, trier, tumble-dryer, tyre, Uriah, via, wire, Zechariah, Zedekiah, Zephaniah •homebuyer

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Papaya

Papaya

The papaya or pawpaw (Carica papaya ) is a tropical tree originally native to the Americas, probably Mexico. This species is easily cultivated, produces large, edible fruits, and now is distributed worldwide to suitable climates where it is grown for subsistence and commercial agriculture. The papaya has large deeply incised, sometimes compound leaves that sprout near the top of the plant. This plant does not develop true woody tissues because it is a giant, soft-stemmed, perennial herb that grows to be as much as 32.8 ft (10 m) tall. Individual plants generally die after about four years.

The papaya is dioecious, that is unisexual, for male and female flowers are borne by separate plants. The flowers are yellow and sweet-smelling and open at night to attract moths, the pollinators of the papaya.

The economically important fruits of the papaya are large, yellow-green or reddish, melon like, multi-seeded berries each weighing as much as 22 lb (10 kg). The fruits of the papaya emerge from the stem of the plant in a phenomenon known as cauliflory. The papaya bears fruit year-round.

The flesh of the papaya fruit is orange-yellow and edible. Papaya fruits can be eaten fresh, boiled, preserved, or reduced to a juice. Other products can be created from the milky latex of the papaya including a base for chewing gum and an extract containing the enzyme papain. Papain is used to tenderize tough meats by pre-digesting some of their proteins.

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Papaya

Papaya

The papaya or pawpaw (Carica papaya) is a tropical tree originally native to the Americas, probably Mexico. This species is easily cultivated, produces large, edible fruits , and now is distributed worldwide to suitable climates where it is grown for subsistence and commercial agriculture. The papaya has large deeply incised, sometimes compound leaves that sprout near the top of the plant . This plant does not develop true woody tissues because it is a giant, soft-stemmed, perennial herb that grows to be as much as 32.8 ft (10 m) tall. Individual plants generally die after about four years.

The papaya is dioecious, that is unisexual, for male and female flowers are borne by separate plants. The flowers are yellow and sweet-smelling and open at night to attract moths , the pollinators of the papaya.

The economically important fruits of the papaya are large, yellow-green or reddish, melon-like, multi-seeded berries each weighing as much as 22 lb (10 kg). The fruits of the papaya emerge from the stem of the plant in a phenomenon known as cauliflory. The papaya bears fruit year-round.

The flesh of the papaya fruit is orange-yellow and edible. Papaya fruits can be eaten fresh, boiled, preserved, or reduced to a juice. Other products can be created from the milky latex of the papaya including a base for chewing gum and an extract containing the enzyme papain. Papain is used to tenderize tough meats by predigesting some of their proteins .

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