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lotus

lotus in Greek mythology, a legendary plant whose fruit induces a dreamy forgetfulness and an unwillingness to depart.

Lotus is also the name of either of two large water lilies, a red-flowered Asian lily, the flower of which is a symbol in Asian art and religion, and a white- or blue-flowered lily regarded as sacred in ancient Egypt.

The word is recorded from the late 15th century, denoting a type of clover or trefoil described by Homer as food for horses; it comes via Latin from Greek lōtos, and is of Semitic origin. The term was used by classical writers to denote various trees and plants. This legendary plant, mentioned by Homer, was thought by later Greek writers to be Ziziphus lotus, a relative of the jujube.
lotus-eater a person who spends their time indulging in pleasure and luxury rather than dealing with practical concerns. The lotus-eaters or Lotophagi in Greek mythology were a people who lived on the fruit of the lotus. Lotophagi is recorded in English from the early 17th century, but the first use of lotus-eater is in the title of a poem by Tennyson, The Lotos-eaters (1832).
lotus position a cross-legged position for meditation, with the feet resting on the thighs.
Lotus Sutra one of the most important texts in Mahayana Buddhism, significant particularly in China and Japan and given special veneration by the Nichiren sect.

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lotus

lo·tus / ˈlōtəs/ • n. 1. any of a number of large water lilies, in particular: ∎  (also sacred lotus) a water lily (Nelumbo nucifera, family Nelumbonaceae) of Asia and northern Australia, typically with dark pink or white-and-pink flowers. ∎  (also American lotus) a yellow-flowered North American water lily (Nelumbo lutea, family Nelumbonaceae) with bowl-shaped leaves. ∎  (also Egyptian lotus) a water lily (the white-flowered Nymphaea lotus and the blue-flowered N. caerulea, family Nymphaeaceae) regarded as sacred in ancient Egypt. 2. (in Greek mythology) a legendary plant whose fruit induces a dreamy forgetfulness and an unwillingness to depart. ∎  the flower of the sacred lotus as a symbol in Asian art and religion. ∎ short for lotus position.

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Lotus

Lotus (Skt., padma). Religious symbol in Eastern religions.

Hinduism

The lotus represents beauty, and also non-attachment: as the lotus, rooted in mud, floats on water without becoming wet, so should the one seeking release live in the world without attachment. More specifically, it represents centres of consciousness (cakra) in the body.

Buddhism

The lotus summarizes the true nature of those who float free of ignorance (avidya) and attain enlightenment (bodhi). It is therefore the throne or seat of a buddha; and in Pure Land, it is the symbol of the Buddha's teaching.

See also PUṆḌARIKA.

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lotus

lotus. Ornament based on one of several water-plants, including the Egyptian water-lily, the source of much architectural enrichment of the stylized, bud, flower, and leaf type. Ancient Egyptian capitals decorated with both bud and flower motifs were common, and were revived in Egyptian Revival design. The lotus is related to a great number of common decorative devices, including the fleur-de-lys, the palmette, and sundry Classical and medieval motifs.

Bibliography

Glazier (1926);
O. Jones (1868)

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lotus

lotus Common name for any water lilies of the genus Nelumbo and several tropical species of the genus Nymphaea. The circular leaves and flowers of some species may be 60cm (2ft) across. Nymphaea is sacred to the Chinese, Egyptians, and Indians. Family Nymphaeaceae. The genus Lotus is made up of the trefoils that belong to the unrelated Fabaceae/Leguminosae family. See also water lily

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lotus

lotus The sacred lotus of India and China, Nelumbium nuciferum, a water plant whose rhizomes and seeds are eaten. A 100‐g portion of the rhizome is a rich source of vitamin C, and supplies 50 kcal (210 kJ).

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lotus

lotus plant yielding a soporific fruit; water-lily of Asia, etc. XVI. — L. lōtus — Gr. lōtós, of unkn. orig.

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lotus

lotus: see water lily.

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lotus

lotus •cactus • saltus • Diophantus • Sanctus •Rastus, Theophrastusaltostratus, cirrostratus, nimbostratus, stratus •conspectus, prospectus •momentous, portentous •asbestos, Festus •apparatus, Donatus, hiatus, status •acetous, boletus, Cetus, Epictetus, fetus, Miletus, quietus •Hephaestus •Benedictus, ictus, rictus •Quintus • linctus • eucalyptus • cistus •coitus •circuitous, fortuitous, gratuitous •Hippolytus • calamitous • tinnitus •Iapetus • crepitus •precipitous, serendipitous •impetus • emeritus • spiritous •Democritus, Theocritus •Tacitus • necessitous •duplicitous, felicitous, solicitous •covetous •iniquitous, ubiquitous •detritus, Heraclitus, Polyclitus, Titus, Vitus •Pocahontas, PontusPlautus, tortoise •cobaltous •Duns Scotus, lotus •hostess •arbutus, Brutus •Eustace • conductus • cultus •coitus interruptus • Augustus •riotous • Herodotus • Oireachtas

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