Bogey

All Sources -
Updated Media sources (1) About encyclopedia.com content Print Topic Share Topic
views updated

bo·gey1 / ˈbōgē/ Golf • n. (pl. -geys) a score of one stroke over par at a hole. • v. (-geys, -geyed) [tr.] play (a hole) in one stroke over par. bo·gey2 / ˈboŏgē/ (also bo·gy) • n. (pl. -geys) a person or thing that causes fear or alarm: the bogey of recession. ∎  an evil or mischievous spirit. ∎  military slang an enemy aircraft.

views updated

bogeyAggie, baggy, craggy, draggy, jaggy, Maggie, quaggy, saggy, scraggy, shaggy, slaggy, snaggy •Hwange •dreggy, eggy, leggy, Peggy •dengue • plaguy •Carnegie, Malpighi •ciggy, piggy, spriggy •boggy, cloggy, doggy, foggy, froggy, groggy, moggie, smoggy, soggy •demagogy •corgi, porgy •bogey, bogie, dogie, fogey, hoagie, stogy, yogi •boogie, boogie-woogie, sastrugi •buggy, druggy, fuggy, muggy, puggy •lungi, sarangi •Lalage • lurgy

views updated

Bogey

An evil spirit. The term may derive from the Slavonic bog (god). Other forms of the name of this ancient sprite, specter, or goblin are bug-a-boo, boo (Yorkshire), boggart, bogle (Scot-land), boggle, bo-guest, bar-guest, boll, bo-man, and bock. Bullbeggar is probably a form of bu and bogey allied to boll (Northern England), an apparition.

(See also Boh )

Sources:

Briggs, Katherine. An Encyclopedia of Fairies: Hobgoblins, Brownies, Bogies, and Other Supernatural Creatures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1976.

views updated

bogey an evil or mischievous spirit. Recorded from the mid 19th century, as a proper name for the Devil, the word is probably related to bogle.

In golf, bogey denotes a score of one stroke over par at a hole, and may come from Bogey (the Devil) regarded as an imaginary player.


views updated

Bogey ( golf ) the number of strokes a good player should need for each hole. XIX. Said to be from an imaginary partner ‘Bogey’ (same as prec.).