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Ashton, Sir Frederick

Sir Frederick Ashton, 1904–88, British choreographer and dancer, b. Guayaquil, Ecuador. He grew up in Peru and was drawn to dance after seeing (1917) a performance by Anna Pavlova there. Traveling to London in the early 1920s, he studied dance with Léonide Massine and Marie Rambert, staged his first work there in 1926, and danced (1928) with Ida Rubinstein's experimental troupe in Paris. Ashton joined the Vic-Wells Ballet, later the Sadler's Wells Ballet (now the Royal Ballet), in 1935 as chief choreographer, and later became associate director and then director of the company. Many of his ballets were created for its prima ballerina, Margot Fonteyn. Ashton is largely responsible for the elegantly reserved style of English classical dance, and his mature works are noted for their lyricism, quiet charm, wit, and precision. They include abstract ballets, such as Symphonic Variations (1946), Scènes de Ballet (1948), and Monotones (1965–66); short dramatic works, such as Daphnis and Chloë and Tiresias (both 1951); and full-length traditional story ballets, such as Cinderella (1948), Sylvia (1952), Ondine (1958), and The Dream (1964). His last major works as a choreographer were La Chatte Metamorphosée en Femme (1985) and Fanfare for Elizabeth (1986). He also appeared as a dancer in comedy and character roles. He was knighted in 1962.

See biographies by D. Vaughan (1977) and J. Kavanagh (1997).

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Ashton, Sir Frederick

Ashton, Sir Frederick (1904–88) British choreographer and ballet director. In 1935 he joined Sadler's Wells Ballet, London, and was its chief choreographer until 1963, then its director (1963–70). His work for dancers such as Margot Fonteyn and Ninette de Valois earned him a reputation as Britain's greatest choreographer. Major pieces include Cinderella (1948), Ondine (1958), Marguèrite, and Armand (both 1963).

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