Gluconeogenesis

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gluconeogenesis The synthesis of glucose from non-carbohydrate precursors. Any compound that can be converted into one of the intermediates of glycolysis is potentially glucogenic. These include amino acids, fatty acids, glycerol, and intermediates of the citric acid cycle.

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gluconeogenesis The synthesis of glucose from non-carbohydrate precursors. Any compound that can be converted into one of the intermediates of glycolysis is potentially glycogenic. These include amino acids, fatty acids, glycerol, and intermediates of the citric-acid cycle.

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gluconeogenesis The synthesis of glucose from noncarbohydrate sources, such as fat and protein. This occurs when the glycogen supplies in the liver are exhausted. The pathway is essentially a reversal of glycolysis from pyruvate to glucose and it can utilize many sources, including amino acids, glycerol, and Krebs cycle intermediates. Large-scale protein and fat catabolism normally occurs only in those suffering from starvation or certain endocrine disorders.

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gluconeogenesis The metabolic processes involved in the formation of glucose from non‐carbohydrate precursors, such as glycerol, lactate, and a variety of amino acids.

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gluconeogenesis (gloo-koh-nee-oh-jen-i-sis) n. the biochemical process in which glucose is synthesized from non-carbohydrate sources, such as amino acids, when carbohydrate is not available in sufficient amounts in the diet.