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episode

episode. In comps. designed on one of the regular patterns, a section containing thematic material of secondary importance is sometimes called an episode. It can also contain new material. In rondo form, the contrasting sections between returns of the main material are sometimes called episodes. In fugue form, an episode follows the exposition and is a passage of connective material, usually a development of a theme from the exposition, leading to another entry or series of entries of the subject. One function of the fugal episode is to effect modulation to various related keys so that later entries may take advantage of this variety.

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episode

ep·i·sode / ˈepiˌsōd/ • n. an event or a group of events occurring as part of a larger sequence: the latest episode in the feud. ∎  each of the separate installments into which a serialized story or radio or television program is divided. ∎  a finite period in which someone is affected by a specified illness: acute psychotic episodes.

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"episode." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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episode

episode dialogue between choric songs; incidental narrative XVII; incidental event XVIII. — Gr. epeisódion, sb. use of n. of epeisódios coming in besides, f. EPI- +eisodos entrance, f. eis into + hodós way, passage.

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episode

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