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antithesis

an·tith·e·sis / anˈti[unvoicedth]əsis/ • n. (pl. -ses / -ˌsēz/ ) a person or thing that is the direct opposite of someone or something else: love is the antithesis of selfishness. ∎  a contrast or opposition between two things. ∎  a figure of speech in which an opposition or contrast of ideas is expressed by parallelism of words that are the opposites of, or strongly contrasted with, each other, such as “hatred stirs up strife, but love covers all sins.” ∎  (in Hegelian philosophy) the negation of the thesis as the second stage in the process of dialectical reasoning. Compare with synthesis.

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ANTITHESIS

ANTITHESIS [Stress: ‘an-TI-the-sis’].
1. In RHETORIC, a construction in which words are opposed but balanced: ‘For many are called, but few are chosen’ (Matthew 22:14); ‘To err is human, to forgive, divine’ (Pope, 1711). Technically, the first part of such constructions is the thesis (‘for many are called’), the second the antithesis (‘but few are chosen’).

2. In general usage, opposite: This policy is the antithesis of everything we believe in. See CHIASMUS.

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antithesis

antithesis (ăntĬth´ĬsĬs), a figure of speech involving a seeming contradiction of ideas, words, clauses, or sentences within a balanced grammatical structure. Parallelism of expression serves to emphasize opposition of ideas. The familiar phrase "Man proposes, God disposes" is an example of antithesis, as is John Dryden's description in "The Hind and the Panther" : "Too black for heaven, and yet too white for hell."

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antithesis

antithesis XV. — late L. — Gr. antíthesis, f. ANTI- + tithénai set, place (cf. THESIS).
So antithetic XVII, antithetical XVI. ult. — Gr. antithetikós.

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