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derive

de·rive / diˈrīv/ • v. [tr.] (derive something from) obtain something from (a specified source): they derived great comfort from this assurance. ∎  (derive something from) base a concept on a logical extension or modification of (another concept): Marx derived his philosophy of history from Hegel. ∎  [intr.] (derive from) (of a word) have (a specified word, usually of another language) as a root or origin: the word “punch” derives from the Hindustani “pancha” | (be derived from) the word “man” is derived from the Sanskrit “manas.” ∎  [intr.] (derive from) arise from or originate in (a specified source): words whose spelling derives from Dr. Johnson's incorrect etymology. ∎  (be derived from) Linguistics (of an expression in a natural language) be linked by a set of stages to (its underlying abstract form). ∎  (be derived from) (of a substance) be formed or prepared by (a chemical or physical process affecting another substance): strong acids are derived from the combustion of fossil fuels. ∎  Math. obtain (a function or equation) from another by a sequence of logical steps, for example by differentiation. DERIVATIVES: de·riv·a·ble adj. ORIGIN: late Middle English (in the sense ‘draw a fluid through or into a channel’): from Old French deriver or Latin derivare, from de- ‘down, away’ + rivus ‘brook, stream.’

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derive

derive pass. and intr. emanate, take its origin XIV; trans. conduct (water) from a source into a channel XV; †convey, direct; obtain from a source XVI. — (O)F. dériver or L. dērīvāre, f. DE- 2 + rīvus brook, stream.
So derivation origination, spec. of a word; deviation into a channel; (med.) withdrawal of morbid fluid. XV. derivative XV. — F. — L.

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