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Amphiaraus

Amphiaraus

A famous soothsayer of classical mythology, son of Oicles and Hypermnestra. He hid himself so that he might not have to go to the war of Thebes, because he had foreseen that he should die there. This indeed happened, but he came to life again. A temple was raised to him in Attica, near a sacred fountain by which he had left Hades. He healed the sick by showing them in a dream the remedies they must use. He also founded many oracles. After they sacrificed, those who consulted the oracle slept under a sheep skin and dreamed a dream, which usually found plenty of interpreters after the event. Amphiaraus was an adept in the art of explaining dreams. Some prophecies in verse, which are no longer extant, were attributed to him.

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Amphiaraüs

Amphiaraüs (ăm´fēərā´əs), in Greek mythology, a prophet, one of the ill-fated Seven against Thebes. He foresaw the disaster of the expedition, but Polynices bribed his wife, Eriphyle, with the magic necklace of Harmonia, to convince him to go. Before setting out he commanded his sons, Alcmaeon and Amphilochus, to avenge his death and to make a second expedition against Thebes. Amphiaraüs was also one of the Argonauts.

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