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native

na·tive / ˈnātiv/ • n. a person born in a specified place or associated with a place by birth, whether subsequently resident there or not: a native of Montreal | an eighteen-year-old Brooklyn native. ∎  a local inhabitant: New York in the summer was too hot even for the natives. ∎ dated, often offens. one of the original inhabitants of a country, esp. a nonwhite as regarded by European colonists or travelers. ∎  an animal or plant indigenous to a place: the marigold is a native of southern Europe. • adj. 1. associated with the country, region, or circumstances of a person's birth: he's a native New Yorker | her native country. ∎  of the indigenous inhabitants of a place: a ceremonial native dance from Fiji. 2. (of a plant or animal) of indigenous origin or growth: pigs are native to China | America's native black bear. 3. (of a quality) belonging to a person's character from birth rather than acquired; innate: some last vestige of native wit prompted Guy to say nothing | a jealousy and rage native to him. ∎  Comput. designed for or built into a given system, esp. denoting the language associated with a given processor, computer, or compiler, and programs written in it. 4. (of a metal or other mineral) found in a pure or uncombined state. PHRASES: go native humorous or derog. (of a person living away from their own country or region) abandon one's own culture, customs, or way of life and adopt those of the country or region one is living in.DERIVATIVES: na·tive·ly adv. na·tive·ness n.

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"native." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"native." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/native-0

"native." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/native-0

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native

native(indigenous) Applied to a species that occurs naturally in an area, and therefore one that has not been introduced by humans either accidentally or intentionally. Of plants found in a particular place, the term is applied to those species that occur naturally in (i.e. are indigenous to) the region and at the site.

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"native." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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native

native (indigenous) Applied to a species that occurs naturally in an area, and therefore one that has not been introduced by humans either accidentally or intentionally. Of plants found in a particular place, the term is applied to those species that occur naturally in the region and at the site.

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"native." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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native

native (indigenous) Applied to a species that occurs naturally in an area, and therefore one that has not been introduced by humans either accidentally or intentionally.

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native

native •active • captive •festive, restive •dative, native, stative •fictive • unitive • octave • costive •emotive, motive, votive •furtive • appraisive

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