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assimilate

as·sim·i·late / əˈsiməˌlāt/ • v. [tr.] 1. take in (information, ideas, or culture) and understand fully. ∎  (usu. be assimilated) absorb and integrate (people, ideas, or culture) into a wider society or culture: pop trends are assimilated into the mainstream with alarming speed | [intr.] the converts were assimilated into the society of their conquerors. ∎  absorb or integrate and use for one's own benefit: the music business assimilated whatever aspects of punk it could turn into profit. ∎  (usu. be assimilated) (of the body or any biological system) absorb and digest (food or nutrients): the sugars in the fruit are readily assimilated by the body. 2. cause (something) to resemble; liken. ∎  [intr.] come to resemble: the churches assimilated to a certain cultural norm. ∎  Phonet. make (a sound) more like another in the same or next word. DERIVATIVES: as·sim·i·la·ble / -ləbəl/ adj. as·sim·i·la·tion / əˌsiməˈlāshən/ n. as·sim·i·la·tive / -ˌlātiv; -lətiv/ adj. as·sim·i·la·tor / -ˌlātər/ n. as·sim·i·la·to·ry / -ləˌtôrē/ adj.

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"assimilate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"assimilate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved February 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/assimilate-0

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assimilate

assimilate
1. The portion of the food energy consumed by an organism that is metabolized by that organism. Some food, or in the case of a plant some light energy, may pass through the organism without being used.

2. To engage in assimilation.

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"assimilate." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"assimilate." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved February 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/assimilate

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assimilate

assimilate
1. The portion of the food energy consumed by an organism that is metabolized by that organism. Some food, or in the case of a plant some light energy, may pass through the organism without being used.

2. To engage in assimilation.

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"assimilate." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"assimilate." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved February 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/assimilate-0

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assimilate

assimilate make like; absorb and incorporate. XV. f. pp. stem of L. assimilāre, f. AS- + similis SIMILAR; see -ATE3.
So assimilation XV. assimilative XIV. — F. or L.

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"assimilate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved February 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/assimilate-1

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assimilate

assimilate The portion of the food energy consumed by an organism that is metabolized by that organism. (Some food may pass through the organism without being used.)

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assimilate

assimilate •circumvallate • bedplate • template •breastplate • nameplate • faceplate •chelate • fishplate • sibilate • jubilate •flagellate • legislate • invigilate •assimilate, dissimilate •depilate, epilate •fibrillate •correlate, intercorrelate •vacillate • tessellate • oscillate •cantillate •hyperventilate, ventilate •titillate • scintillate • constellate •mutilate • oblate • hotplate •electroplate • bookplate • footplate •congratulate •confabulate, tabulate •ambulate, circumambulate, perambulate •adulate • coagulate •strangulate, triangulate •ejaculate •calculate, miscalculate •emasculate • granulate • encapsulate •regulate • speculate • emulate •infibulate • acidulate •articulate, gesticulate, matriculate •simulate, stimulate •manipulate, stipulate •insulate • capitulate •discombobulate • modulate •flocculate, inoculate •osculate •copulate, populate •expostulate, postulate •ovulate • formulate • ululate •accumulate, cumulate •undulate • pustulate • circulate •lanceolate •annihilate, violate •number plate • fingerplate • escalate •percolate • immolate •crenellate (US crenelate) •extrapolate • copperplate •interpellate, interpolate •desolate • insufflate • isolate •apostolate • contemplate

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