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Catskill Mountains

CATSKILL MOUNTAINS

CATSKILL MOUNTAINS. Part of the great Appalachian Mountain chain, the Catskill Mountains are located on the west side of the Hudson River, about one hundred miles northwest of New York City. Their heavily wooded terrain encompasses more than 6,000 square miles, with the highest peak of 4,204 feet at Slide Mountain. The area's most rapid growth came in the nineteenth century and accelerated with the building of rail lines, the first being the Canajoharie and Catskill Railroad, completed in 1828. Difficult to farm, the area developed commercially as a tanning and lumbering center while its peaks were excavated for bluestone and flagstone. In the late nineteenth century, the despoiling of the mountains led to one of the first conservationist movements, with large sections of the Catskills protected by state legislation beginning in 1885. Today almost 300,000 acres are designated as a preserve. Long famous as a vacation, resort, and camping center, the dense woods, dramatic waterfalls, splendid vistas, and clear mountain lakes of the Catskill Mountains continue to attract visitors, sportsmen, and vacationers.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adams, Arthur G. The Catskills: An Illustrated Historical Guide with Gazetteer. New York: Fordham University Press, 1994.

Kudish, Michael. The Catskill Forest: A History. Fleischmanns, New York: Purple Mountain Press, 2000.

Mary LouLustig

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"Catskill Mountains." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Catskill Mountains." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/catskill-mountains

"Catskill Mountains." Dictionary of American History. . Retrieved May 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/catskill-mountains

Catskill Mountains

Catskill Mountains, dissected plateau of the Appalachian Mt. system, SE N.Y., W of the Hudson River. This glaciated region, wooded and rolling, with deep gorges and many waterfalls, is drained by the headstreams of the Delaware River and by Esopus, Schoharie, Rondout, and Catskill creeks. Most of the summits are c.3,000 ft (910 m) above sea level; Slide Mt. (4,180 ft/1,274 m) is the highest. Bluestone, a form of sandstone, is quarried in the Catskills. Close to New York City, the area is popular with summer and winter vacationers; the famed "Borscht Belt," a string of Jewish family resorts, is now in decline, but outdoor centers are multiplying. The area is also notable for its concentration of Buddhist centers. Ashokan Reservoir is a source of the New York metropolitan area's water supply. Catskill Park embraces much of the Catskills, including the region of the Rip Van Winkle legend.

See A. Evers, The Catskills (1984).

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"Catskill Mountains." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Catskill Mountains." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/catskill-mountains

"Catskill Mountains." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved May 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/catskill-mountains

Catskill Mountains

Catskill Mountains Plateau of the Appalachian system on the w bank of the Hudson River, se New York, USA. The highest peak is Slide Mountain, 1282m (4204ft). Site of the Rip Van Winkle legend, its numerous forests, streams and lakes attracted the painters of the Hudson River School. Today, the Catskills are a popular resort area.

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"Catskill Mountains." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Catskill Mountains." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/catskill-mountains

"Catskill Mountains." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved May 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/catskill-mountains

Rip van Winkle

Rip van Winkle the hero of a story in Washington Irving' Sketch Book (1819–20), a good-for-nothing who fell asleep in the Catskill Mountains and awoke after twenty years to find the world completely changed.

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"Rip van Winkle." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rip van Winkle." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rip-van-winkle

"Rip van Winkle." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved May 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rip-van-winkle