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citric acid

citric acid or 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid, HO2CCH2C(OH)(CO2H)CH2CO2H, an organic carboxylic acid containing three carboxyl groups; it is a solid at room temperature, melts at 153°C, and decomposes at higher temperatures. It is responsible for the tart taste of various fruits in which it occurs, e.g., lemons, limes, oranges, pineapples, and gooseberries. It can be extracted from the juice of citrus fruits by adding calcium oxide (lime) to form calcium citrate, an insoluble precipitate that can be collected by filtration; the citric acid can be recovered from its calcium salt by adding sulfuric acid. It is obtained also by fermentation of glucose with the aid of the mold Aspergillus niger and can be obtained synthetically from acetone or glycerol. Citric acid is used in soft drinks and in laxatives and cathartics. Its salts, the citrates, have many uses, e.g., ferric ammonium citrate is used in making blueprint paper. Sour salt, used in cooking, is citric acid.

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"citric acid." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"citric acid." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/citric-acid

"citric acid." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/citric-acid

citric acid

citric acid An organic acid (chemically a tricarboxylic acid) which is widely distributed in plant and animal tissues; it is an important metabolic intermediate, and yields 2.47 kcal (10.9 kJ)/g. It is used as a flavouring and acidifying agent, and its salts (citrates) are used as acidity regulators. Commercially it is either prepared by the fermentation of sugars by the mould Aspergillus niger or extracted from citrus fruits (lemon juice contains 5–8% citric acid).

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"citric acid." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"citric acid." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid

"citric acid." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid

citric acid

citric acid Colourless, crystalline solid (C6H8O7) with a sour taste. It is found in a free form in citrus fruits such as lemons and oranges, and is used for flavouring, in effervescent salts, and as a mordant (colour-fixer) in dyeing. Properties: r.d. 1.54; m.p. 153°C (307.4°F).

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"citric acid." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"citric acid." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/citric-acid

"citric acid." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/citric-acid

citric acid

cit·ric ac·id • n. Chem. a sharp-tasting crystalline acid, C6H8O7, present in the juice of lemons and other sour fruits. It is made commercially by the fermentation of sugar and used as a flavoring and setting agent.

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"citric acid." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"citric acid." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid

"citric acid." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid

citric acid

citric acid A white crystalline hydroxy carboxylic acid, HOOCCH2C(OH)(COOH)CH2COOH. It is present in citrus fruits and is an intermediate in the Krebs cycle in plant and animal cells.

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"citric acid." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"citric acid." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid

"citric acid." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid

citric acid

citric acid (sit-rik) n. an organic acid found naturally in citrus fruits. Citric acid is formed in the first stage of the Krebs cycle. Formula: CH2(COOH)C(OH)(COOH)CH2COOH.

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"citric acid." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"citric acid." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/citric-acid