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sodium bicarbonate

sodium bicarbonate or sodium hydrogen carbonate, chemical compound, NaHCO3, a white crystalline or granular powder, commonly known as bicarbonate of soda or baking soda. It is soluble in water and very slightly soluble in alcohol. It evolves carbon dioxide gas when heated above about 50°C, a property made use of in baking powder, of which it is a component. It is also decomposed by most acids; the acid is neutralized and carbon dioxide is given off. The major use of sodium bicarbonate is in foods, e.g., baked goods. It is used in effervescent "salts" and is sometimes used medically to correct excess stomach acidity. It is also used in several kinds of fire extinguishers. Although it is an intermediate product in the Solvay process for making sodium carbonate, it is more economical to prepare it from purified sodium carbonate than to purify the intermediate. Because the bicarbonate is less soluble than the carbonate, carbon dioxide gas is bubbled into a saturated solution of pure carbonate, and the bicarbonate precipitates out to be collected and dried.

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"sodium bicarbonate." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sodium bicarbonate

sodium bicarbonate Also known as baking soda or bicarbonate of soda (chemically NaHCO3), liberates carbon dioxide when in contact with acid. Used as a raising agent in baking flour confectionery. See also baking powder.

A small pinch of sodium bicarbonate preserves the green colour in cooked vegetables (too much destroys the vitamin C). Also helps to reduce acidity when stewing sour plums or rhubarb.

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"sodium bicarbonate." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sodium bicarbonate

sodium bicarbonate (by-kar-bŏn-ayt) n. a salt of sodium that neutralizes acid and is usually administered by mouth to treat metabolic (particularly renal) acidosis and mild urinary-tract infections. It is also an ingredient of many antacid preparations and is used in the form of drops to soften earwax.

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"sodium bicarbonate." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sodium bicarbonate

sodium bicarbonate (sodium hydrogen carbonate, NaHCO3, popularly known as bicarbonate of soda) White, crystalline salt that decomposes in acid or on heating to release carbon dioxide gas. It has a slightly alkaline reaction and is an ingredient of indigestion medicines.

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"sodium bicarbonate." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sodium bicarbonate

so·di·um bi·car·bon·ate • n. a soluble white powder, NaHCO3, used in fire extinguishers and effervescent drinks and as a leavening agent in baking. Also called baking soda.

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"sodium bicarbonate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"sodium bicarbonate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sodium-bicarbonate