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Camel

Camel

Rock group

Goose Flies Camel Over the Hump

Selected discography

Sources

Discussing the use of lights and films during his bands performances, Camel guitarist and vocalist Andrew Latimer told Melody Maker in 1976, This is the first time weve used films, and I dont want us to get into it too much. Were not a very bopping band, so its nice for the audience to have something to watch.

The British progressive rock group Camel formed in 1972 with the blues-rock trio Brew, consisting of Latimer, bassist Doug Ferguson, and drummer Andy Ward. After backing singer Philip Goodhand-Tait on an album, the trio was joined by organist and vocalist Peter Bardens and began rehearsing original material. Camels sound featured extensive interplay between Latimers guitar and Bardenss keyboards, underpinned by Wards swinging percussion. Vocals were not the bands main focus. During the recording of Camels debut album, the producer suggested that the group find a better singer. After auditioning 30 unsuitable vocalists, the search was abandoned and the recording sessions continued.

The band became a fixture on the English college circuit. In a 1973 interview with Melody Maker, Peter Bardens related the importance of these venues to Camel, I think the college circuit plays a very important part in any new bands future. They are one of those rare places where small bands get the chance to play, and whats more, they are always good payers. One early concert appearance that provided Camel with underground credibility was on October 8, 1973 at the Greasy Truckers Party at Dingwalls Dance Hall in London. A live cut from that show, God of Light Revisited Parts 1, 2, and 3 formed one side of a rare double album commemorating the event, which also featured contributions by progressive contemporaries Gong and Henry Cow.

As a result of constant touring, the bands second album Mirage sold much better than its self-titled debut. Bardens told Melody Maker, We started the band from scratch. We had no money and no equipment. In three years weve done four tours of Britain, and were the sort of band that creeps up on you.

Goose Flies Camel Over the Hump

Camels first taste of success came with its 1975 album The Snow Goose, an all-instrumental work based on Paul Gallicos childrens book. The album reached both British and American charts. Latimer commented to Melody Maker about the writing of the album: When wed written the piece we were really pleased, then again, it wasnt until wed finished the album that we realized what wed got. Andy Ward continued, Snow Goose has opened up a reaction in the audience and the press that wed been waiting for for a long time. The band was voted Melody Makers Brightest Hope in that magazines 1975 poll, and performed at The Royal Albert Hall with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Moonmadness, released in 1976, featured several songs inspired by the personalities of the band members, including Chord Change for Bardens, Air Born for Latimer, Another Night for Ferguson, and Lunar Sea for Ward. Toward the end of the recording sessions for that album, bassist Doug Ferguson left to form the group Head Waiter. His replacement, Richard Sinclair, was the bassist and vocalist for veteran progressive groups Caravan and Hatfield and the North. On Rain Dances, Sinclair became the distinctive vocalist Camel had lacked. A Melody Maker contributor wrote, [Sinclairs] vocals were a rare treat, totally unaffected by the Americanisation most rock singers turned to without question, and delivered with at one and pitch that would delight a choir master.

In 1978 Peter Bardens left Camel, replaced by two more ex-Caravan members, Richards cousin David Sinclair and Jan Schelhaas, causing Camel to earn the nickname Caramel by the music press. The band also added former King Crimson sax and flute player Mel Collins. Before recording sessions could be held, however, Richard and David Sinclair departed.

For the Record

Members include Peter Bardens (member c. 1971-79), organ, keyboards, vocals; Colin Bass (joined c. 1979), bass, vocals; Paul Burgess (joined c. 1984), drums; Mel Collins (member c. 1978-79), sax, flute; Doug Ferguson (member c. 1971-76), bass; Andrew Latimer, guitar, vocals; Jan Schelhaas (member c. 1978-79), keyboards; Ton Scherpenzeel (joined c. 1984), keyboards; David Sinclair (member c. 1978-79), organ, piano; Richard Sinclair (born June 6, 1948, Canterbury, Kent, England; member c. 1977-79), bass, vocals; Andy Ward (born September 28, 1952, London, England; member c. 1971-81), drums, percussion.

Formed c. 1971, in London, England; backed Philip Goodhand-Tait on album and tour, 1971; released debut album Camel on MCA, 1973; appeared at Greasy Truckers Party, 1973; played at Royal Albert Hall with London Symphony Orchestra, 1975; formed Camel Productions, 1991.

Addresses: Record company; Camel Productions, P. O. Box 4786, Mountain View, CA 94040.

Camel found itself deserted by the British music press during the early eighties, as press attention shifted to punk rock. Despite sellout tours of Europe, the groups records no longer sold well. Andrew Latimer told Melody Maker in 1980, Sometimes its frustrating if you do something you think is a work of art and it gets totally ignored. Another major setback occurred when Andy Ward left the band due to the pressures of touring and a distaste for the music industry in general, leaving Latimer as the last original member of Camel.

Latimer was pressured by the record company to record more pop-oriented material on 1982s The Single Factor which featured members of The Alan Parsons Project. Peter Bardens makes a guest appearance on the track Sasquatch along with founding Genesis guitarist Anthony Philips. Following the release of Stationary Travellerin 1984, inspired by the social and physical division of Berlin, Camel took a seven-year hiatus.

Andrew Latimer relocated to California during the early nineties, and formed Camel Productions to release new and archival Camel material. Camels nineties output includes Dust and Dreams, inspired by John Steinbecks The Grapes of Wrath. Harbour of Tears was inspired by Latimers search for his familys roots following his fathers death. In 1997 Camel completed a world tour, performing to sell-out crowds in nine countries. Latimer and Camel Productions also produce and distribute an annual newsletter which keeps Camel in the public eye.

In addition to a prolific solo career, Bardens enjoyed a brief stint down memory lane with Ward for a nostalgically titled group Mirage, performing a few select dates in 1994. Since leaving Camel in the early eighties, Ward has been involved with several other projects, including progressive rockers Marillion, Richard Sinclairs Caravan of Dreams, and his current band, English psychedelic rockers, The Bevis Frond.

Throughout its 25-year existence, Camel has scaled the heights of fame as well as the depths of mainstream media derision, acquiring a dedicated following along the way. Through Andrew Latimers company, Camel Productions, Camel remains alive and well.

Selected discography

Albums

(With Philip Goodhand-Tait), I Think Ill Write a Song, Vertigo, 1972.

Camel, MCA, 1973, reissued Camel Productions, 1992.

God of Light Revisited Parts 1, 2, and 3 from Greasy Truckers Party, Greasy Truckers, 1973.

Mirage, Janus, 1974, reissued Deram, 1994.

The Snow Goose, Janus, 1975, reissued Deram, 1994.

Moonmadness, Janus, 1976, reissued London, 1992.

Rain Dances, Janus, 1977, reissued Deram, 1992.

Breathless, Arista, 1978, reissued One Way, 1994.

A Live Record, London, 1978.

I Can See Your House from Here, Arista, 1979, reissued One Way, 1994.

Nude, Passport, 1981, reissued London, 1995.

The Single Factor, Passport, 1982.

Stationary Traveler, Decca, 1984.

Compact Compilation (rec. 1973-1975), Rhino, 1985.

Pressure Points - Live in Concert, Decca, 1985.

Dust and Dreams, Camel Productions, 1991.

Never Let Go, Camel Productions, 1993.

On the Road 1972, Camel Productions, 1993.

Echoes, The Retrospective (rec. 1973-1991), Polygram, 1993.

On the Road 1982, Camel Productions, 1994.

Harbour of Tears, Camel Productions, 1996.

On the Road 1981, Camel Productions, 1997.

Related projects

(With Richard Sinclair, David Sinclair, Jan Schelhaas), Caravan, Canterbury Tales: The Best of Caravan 1969-1975, Polygram, 1994.

David Sinclair, Moon over Man (recorded 1978), Voiceprint, 1994.

(With Andy Ward and Richard Sinclair), Todd Dillingham, The Wilde Canterbury Dream, Voiceprint, 1994.

(With Andy Ward and Richard Sinclair), Caravan of Dreams, HTD, 1994.

(With Andy Ward), Adrian Shaw, Tea for the Hydra, Woronzow, 1994.

(With Andy Ward), The Bevis Frond, Sprawl, Woronzow, 1994.

(With Andy Ward), The Bevis Frond, Superseeder, Woronzow, 1995.

(With Andy Ward), Richard Sinclair, R.S.V.P., Sinclair Songs, 1996.

(With Andy Ward), Mary Lou Lord, Martian Saints (EP), Kill Rock Stars, 1997.

(With Andy Ward), The Deviants, Memphis Psychosis and The Bevis Frond, Red Hair from Ptolemaic Terrascope Terrastock Special Edition CD, Flydaddy, 1997.

Peter Bardens solo projects

The Answer, Verve, 1970.

Write My Name in Dust, Verve, 1971.

Heart to Heart, Arista, 1979.

Seen One Earth, Capitol, 1987.

Speed of Light, Capitol, 1988.

Watercolours, Miramar, 1991.

Further Than You Know, Miramar, 1993.

(With Mirage), Double Live, Voiceprint, 1994.

Big Sky, HTD, 1995.

Sources

Books

Joynson, Vernon, Tapestry of Delights: The Comprehensive Guide to British Music of the Beat, R&B, Psychedelic, and Progressive Eras 1963-1976, Borderline Productions, 1995.

Periodicals

Melody Maker, February 3, 1973; July 6, 1974; November 23, 1974; July 12, 1975; September 13, 1975; October 25, 1975; April 10, 1976; September 24, 1977; November 12, 1977; January 19, 1980.

Online

www.tau.ac.il/~ofirz/camel/welcome.htm

www.alpes-net.fr/~bigbang/calyx.html

www.terrascope.org

Jim Powers

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camel

camel, ruminant mammal of the family Camelidae. The family consists of three genera, the true camels of Asia (genus Camelus); the wild guanaco and the domesticated alpaca and llama, all of South America (genus Lama); and the vicuña, also of South America (genus Vicugna). The hooves on members of the family are much reduced, growing only on the upper surface of the outside toes of the feet.

The two species of true camel are the single-humped Arabian camel, or dromedary, Camelus dromedarius, a domesticated animal used in Arabia and North Africa, and the two-humped Bactrian camel (C. bactrianus) of central Asia. Some wild Bactrian camels exist in Turkistan and Mongolia. The humps are storage places for fat. Camels range in color from dirty white to dark brown and have long necks, small ears, tough-skinned lips, and powerful teeth, some of which are sharply pointed. The camel uses the mouth in fighting. Adaptations to desert life include broad, flat, thick-soled two-toed feet that do not sink into the sand; the ability to go without drinking for several days—or longer if juicy plants are available; and valvular nostrils lined with hairs for protection against flying sand. Horny pads help to protect the chest, knees, and thigh joints against injury from the hard surfaces on which the camel sleeps.

Strong camels usually carry from 500 to 600 lb (230 to 270 kg) and cover about 30 mi (48 km) a day. Some Bactrian camels can transport 1,000 lb (450 kg). A light, fleet breed of dromedary is used for riding and not for bearing heavy loads. The name dromedary was formerly applied to any swift riding camel.

Geologic findings indicate that the camel originated in North America, that one group migrated to Asia and the other to South America, and that both became extinct in North America probably after the glacial period. Camels are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Camelidae.

See studies by H. Gauthier-Pilters and A. I. Dagg (1981) and R. Irwin (2010).

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Camels

CAMELS

domesticated ruminant of central asia, arabia, and north africa.

A domesticated animal, with one or two humps, that is used as a mode of transportation in the Middle East, the camel is a survivor of an almost vanished group of ungulates (hoofed mammals) that once populated all the large land masses of the world except Australia. Its close relatives are the South American llama, alpaca, guanaco, and vicuña. The only camels existing today are two domesticated species: the Arabian dromedary, Camelus dromedarius (or ibil ), which has one hump and is used for riding; and the two-humped Bactrian camel, Camelus bactrianus, which has shorter legs and is more heavily built. A few survive in the Gobi Desert.

Traditional belief has it that one-humped camels do not adapt well to cold or moist climates nor the two-humped camel to extremely hot climates. Both store fat in their humps, have long necks suitable for feeding on bushes and trees, and have padded feet suited for travel on sand but ill-suited for travel on mud. Both have the capacity to go long intervals without water. Camels do not store water as some folk stories allege. Rather, they conserve it through highly efficient kidneys that allow them to process water with a high concentration of impurities; they also have the capacity to absorb heat by allowing their blood temperature to rise, without ill effect. The horn of Africa constitutes the largest and most abundant camel territory in the world and today Somalia alone has a camel population exceeding four million. Camel milk is a dietary staple in Somalia. Camels exist as a form of wealth and nourishment and form part of the traditional bride-price.


Bibliography


Bulliet, Richard. The Camel and the Wheel. New York: Columbia University Press, 1990.

Mia Bloom

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"Camels." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Camels." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/camels

camel

cam·el / ˈkaməl/ • n. 1. a large, long-necked ungulate mammal (genus Camelus) of arid country, with long slender legs, broad cushioned feet, and either one or two fat-storing humps on the back. The camel family (Camelidae) also includes the llama and its relatives. ∎  a fabric made from camel hair. ∎  a yellowish-fawn color like that of camel hair. 2. an apparatus for raising a sunken ship, consisting of one or more watertight chests to provide buoyancy. ∎  a large floating fender used to keep a vessel off the dock.

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dromedary

drom·e·dar·y / ˈdräməˌderē/ • n. (pl. -dar·ies) an Arabian camel, esp. one of a light and swift breed trained for riding or racing. ORIGIN: Middle English: from Old French dromedaire or late Latin dromedarius (camelus) ‘swift camel,’ based on Greek dromas, dromad- ‘runner.’

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"dromedary." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dromedary-0

camel

camel Large, hump-backed, ungulate mammal of the family Camelidae. There are two species – the two-humped Bactrian of central Asia and the single-humped Arabian dromedary. Its broad, padded feet and ability to travel long periods without water make the camel a perfect desert animal. Genus Camelus.

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"camel." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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camel

camel the camel can survive for long periods without food or drink, chiefly by using up the fat reserves in its hump; from this comes the name ship of the desert.

Camels are the emblem of the 4th-century Egyptian martyr St Mennas, probably because pilgrims to his shrine arrive by camel.

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dromedary

dromedary light fleet one-humped camel. XIV. — AN. *dromedarie, OF. dromedaire (mod. dromadaire), or late L. dromedārius, for *dromadārius, f. dromas, dromad- dromedary (- Gr. dromás, -ad- runner; cf. prec.); see -ARY.

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camel

camel OE. camel, reinforced in ME. by OF. cameil, etc. (mod. chameau) :- L. camēlus (also *camellus) — Gr kámēlos, of Sem. orig. (Heb. gāmāl).

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dromedary

dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) See CAMELIDAE.

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dromedary

dromedary: see camel.

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camel

camel See CAMELIDAE.

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camel

camel •sewellel •camel, enamel, entrammel, mammal, trammel •miasmal, phantasmal •Carmel •abysmal, baptismal, catechismal, dismal, paroxysmal •animal • minimal • lachrymal •maximal •decimal, infinitesimal •septimal • optimal • primal • Rommel •abnormal, conformal, formal, normal, paranormal, subnormal •chromosomal • Kümmel •Brummell, pommel, pummel •epidermal, geothermal, isothermal, pachydermal, taxidermal, thermal

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dromedary

dromedarybeery, bleary, cheery, dearie, dreary, Dun Laoghaire, eerie, eyrie (US aerie), Kashmiri, leery, peri, praemunire, query, smeary, teary, theory, weary •Deirdre • incendiary • intermediary •subsidiary •auxiliary, ciliary, domiciliary •apiary • topiary • farriery • furriery •justiciary •bestiary, vestiary •breviary • aviary • hosiery •diary, enquiry, expiry, fiery, friary, inquiry, miry, priory, spiry, wiry •podiatry, psychiatry •dowry, floury, flowery, loury, showery, towery •brewery • jewellery (US jewelry) •curie, de jure, fioriture, fury, houri, Jewry, jury, Manipuri, Missouri, moory, Newry, tandoori, Urey •statuary • actuary • sanctuary •obituary • sumptuary • voluptuary •January • electuary • ossuary •mortuary •Bradbury, Cadbury •blackberry, hackberry •cranberry • waxberry •Barbary, barberry •Shaftesbury • raspberry •bayberry, blaeberry •Avebury • Aylesbury • Sainsbury •bilberry, tilbury •bribery •corroboree, jobbery, robbery, slobbery, snobbery •dogberry • Roddenberry • Fosbury •strawberry • Salisbury •crowberry, snowberry •chokeberry •Rosebery, Shrewsbury •blueberry, dewberry •Dewsbury • Bloomsbury • gooseberry •blubbery, rubbery, shrubbery •Sudbury • mulberry • huckleberry •Bunbury • husbandry • loganberry •Canterbury • Glastonbury •Burberry, turbary •hatchery • archery •lechery, treachery •stitchery, witchery •debauchery • butchery • camaraderie •cindery, tindery •industry • dromedary • lapidary •spidery • bindery • doddery •quandary • powdery • boundary •bouldery • embroidery •prudery, rudery •do-goodery • shuddery • thundery •prebendary • legendary • secondary •amphorae • wafery •midwifery, periphery •infantry • housewifery • spoofery •puffery • sulphury (US sulfury) •Calgary •beggary, Gregory •vagary •piggery, priggery, whiggery •brigandry • bigotry • allegory •vinegary • category • subcategory •hoggery, toggery •pettifoggery • demagoguery •roguery • sugary •buggery, skulduggery, snuggery, thuggery •Hungary • humbuggery •ironmongery • lingerie • treasury •usury • menagerie • pageantry •Marjorie • kedgeree • gingery •imagery • orangery • savagery •forgery • soldiery • drudgery •perjury, surgery •microsurgery •hackery, quackery, Thackeray, Zachary •mountebankery • knick-knackery •gimcrackery • peccary • grotesquerie •bakery, fakery, jacquerie •chickaree, chicory, hickory, Terpsichore, trickery •whiskery • apothecary •crockery, mockery, rockery •falconry • jiggery-pokery •cookery, crookery, rookery •brusquerie •puckery, succory •cuckoldry •calorie, gallery, Malory, salary, Valerie •saddlery • balladry • gallantry •kilocalorie • diablerie • chandlery •harlotry • celery • pedlary •exemplary •helotry, zealotry •nailery, raillery •Tuileries •ancillary, artillery, capillary, codicillary, distillery, fibrillary, fritillary, Hilary, maxillary, pillory •mamillary • tutelary • corollary •bardolatry, hagiolatry, iconolatry, idolatry •cajolery, drollery •foolery, tomfoolery •constabulary, vocabulary •scapulary • capitulary • formulary •scullery • jugglery • cutlery •chancellery • epistolary • burglary •mammary • fragmentary •passementerie • flimflammery •armory, armoury, gendarmerie •almonry •emery, memory •creamery • shimmery • primary •rosemary • yeomanry •parfumerie, perfumery •flummery, Montgomery, mummery, summary, summery •gossamery • customary • infirmary •cannery, granary, tannery •canonry •antennary, bimillenary, millenary, venery •tenantry • chicanery •beanery, bicentenary, catenary, centenary, deanery, greenery, machinery, plenary, scenery, senary, septenary •disciplinary, interdisciplinary •hymnary • missionary •ordinary, subordinary •valetudinary • imaginary • millinery •culinary • seminary • preliminary •luminary • urinary • veterinary •mercenary • sanguinary •binary, finery, pinery, quinary, vinery, winery •Connery • Conakry • ornery • joinery •buffoonery, poltroonery, sublunary, superlunary •gunnery, nunnery •consuetudinary • visionary •exclusionary • legionary • pulmonary •coronary • reactionary • expansionary •concessionary, confessionary, discretionary •confectionery, insurrectionary, lectionary •deflationary, inflationary, probationary, stationary, stationery •expeditionary, petitionary, prohibitionary, traditionary, transitionary •dictionary • cautionary •ablutionary, counter-revolutionary, devolutionary, elocutionary, evolutionary, revolutionary, substitutionary •functionary •diversionary, reversionary •fernery, quaternary, ternary •peppery • extempore • weaponry •apery, drapery, japery, napery, papery, vapoury (US vapory) •frippery, slippery •coppery, foppery •popery • dupery • trumpery •February • heraldry • knight-errantry •arbitrary • registrary • library •contrary • horary • supernumerary •itinerary • honorary • funerary •contemporary, extemporary, temporary •literary • brasserie • chancery •accessory, intercessory, pessary, possessory, tesserae •dispensary, incensory, ostensory, sensory, suspensory •tracery •pâtisserie, rotisserie •emissary • dimissory •commissary, promissory •janissary • necessary • derisory •glossary • responsory • sorcery •grocery • greengrocery •delusory, illusory •compulsory • vavasory • adversary •anniversary, bursary, cursory, mercery, nursery •haberdashery •evidentiary, penitentiary, plenipotentiary, residentiary •beneficiary, fishery, judiciary •noshery • gaucherie • fiduciary •luxury • tertiary •battery, cattery, chattery, flattery, tattery •factory, manufactory, olfactory, phylactery, refractory, satisfactory •artery, martyry, Tartary •mastery, plastery •directory, ex-directory, interjectory, rectory, refectory, trajectory •peremptory •alimentary, complementary, complimentary, documentary, elementary, parliamentary, rudimentary, sedimentary, supplementary, testamentary •investigatory •adulatory, aleatory, approbatory, celebratory, clarificatory, classificatory, commendatory, congratulatory, consecratory, denigratory, elevatory, gyratory, incantatory, incubatory, intimidatory, modificatory, participatory, placatory, pulsatory, purificatory, reificatory, revelatory, rotatory •natatory • elucidatory • castigatory •mitigatory • justificatory •imprecatory • equivocatory •flagellatory • execratory • innovatory •eatery, excretory •glittery, jittery, skittery, twittery •benedictory, contradictory, maledictory, valedictory, victory •printery, splintery •consistory, history, mystery •presbytery •inhibitory, prohibitory •hereditary • auditory • budgetary •military, paramilitary •solitary • cemetery • limitary •vomitory • dormitory • fumitory •interplanetary, planetary, sanitary •primogenitary • dignitary •admonitory, monitory •unitary • monetary • territory •secretary • undersecretary •plebiscitary • repository • baptistery •transitory •depositary, depository, expository, suppository •niterie •Godwottery, lottery, pottery, tottery •bottomry • watery • psaltery •coterie, notary, protonotary, rotary, votary •upholstery •bijouterie, charcuterie, circumlocutory •persecutory • statutory • salutary •executory •contributory, retributory, tributary •interlocutory •buttery, fluttery •introductory • adultery • effrontery •perfunctory • blustery • mediatory •retaliatory • conciliatory • expiatory •denunciatory, renunciatory •appreciatory, depreciatory •initiatory, propitiatory •dietary, proprietary •extenuatory •mandatary, mandatory •predatory • sedentary • laudatory •prefatory • offertory • negatory •obligatory •derogatory, interrogatory, supererogatory •nugatory •expurgatory, objurgatory, purgatory •precatory •explicatory, indicatory, vindicatory •confiscatory, piscatory •dedicatory • judicatory •qualificatory • pacificatory •supplicatory •communicatory, excommunicatory •masticatory • prognosticatory •invocatory • obfuscatory •revocatory • charlatanry •depilatory, dilatory, oscillatory •assimilatory • consolatory •voluntary • emasculatory •ejaculatory •ambulatory, circumambulatory, perambulatory •regulatory •articulatory, gesticulatory •manipulatory • copulatory •expostulatory • circulatory •amatory, declamatory, defamatory, exclamatory, inflammatory, proclamatory •crematory • segmentary •lachrymatory •commentary, promontory •informatory, reformatory •momentary •affirmatory, confirmatory •explanatory • damnatory •condemnatory •cosignatory, signatory •combinatory •discriminatory, eliminatory, incriminatory, recriminatory •comminatory • exterminatory •hallucinatory • procrastinatory •monastery • repertory •emancipatory • anticipatory •exculpatory, inculpatory •declaratory, preparatory •respiratory • perspiratory •vibratory •migratory, transmigratory •exploratory, laboratory, oratory •inauguratory • adjuratory •corroboratory • reverberatory •refrigeratory • compensatory •desultory • dysentery •exhortatory, hortatory •salutatory • gustatory • lavatory •inventory •conservatory, observatory •improvisatory •accusatory, excusatory •lathery •feathery, heathery, leathery •dithery, slithery •carvery •reverie, severy •Avery, bravery, knavery, quavery, Savery, savory, savoury, slavery, wavery •thievery •livery, quivery, shivery •silvery •ivory, salivary •ovary •discovery, recovery •servery • equerry • reliquary •antiquary • cassowary • stipendiary •colliery • pecuniary • chinoiserie •misery • wizardry • citizenry •advisory, provisory, revisory, supervisory •causerie, rosary

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"dromedary." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dromedary." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dromedary

"dromedary." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dromedary