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Genesis

Genesis

Rock band

For the Record

Selected discography

Sources

Genesis is one of only a handful of rock music groups that has endured more than two decades in the ebb and flow of the show business spotlight, and this is more a tribute to the groups versatility and flexibility than any phenomenal and enduring popularity. Genesis has never been in the same league as such all-time great English supergroups as the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, or Led Zeppelin. They have never reached the absolute zenith of the pop world at any one moment, as each of the above groups have doneand yet they have been more consistent, quietly making music year in and year out without a lot of fanfare or dramatic personality clashes.

Which is not to say that Genesis has not undergone some major changes since its inception in the late 1960s. Indeed, the history of the band could be easily divided into two distinct phases. The first, stretching roughly from 1966 to 1975, could be called the Art-Rock Years, or, more simply, the Peter Gabriel Years after the singer who was the groups driving creative force and chief vocalist before leaving for an outstanding

For the Record

Genesis formed in 1966 at Charterhouse prep school, England; original members included Tony Banks (bom March 27, 1950, in England), keyboards; Michael Rutherford (born October 2, 1950, in England), guitar, bass, and vocals; Peter Gabriel (born May 13, 1950 in England), vocals (quit band, 1974); and Anthony Philips, guitar, (quit, 1970). Later additions include Phil Collins, (born January 31, 1951, in London, England), drums, vocals (joined band, 1970); and Steve Hackett (born February 12, 1950, in England), guitar (joined band, 1970; quit, 1977).

Band formed, 1966; recorded first LP, From Genesis to Revelation, 1968; signed with Charisma label, 1970; vocalist Peter Gabriel quit band, 1974; drummer Phil Collins became lead vocalist, 1976, with drummers Chester Thompson and Bill Bruford added for tours; guitarist Steve Hacket departs, 1977; all three remaining band members release solo LPsBanks (1979), Rutherford (1980), and Collins (1981)while continuing to produce records as Genesis; band releases highly successful LP Invisible Touch,1986, followed by $60 million world tour under sponsorship of Michelob beer, 1987.

Addresses: Record Company Atlantic Record Co.,75 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10019.

solo career. The second, current phase could well be called the Phil Collins Years, for the man who stepped out from behind the drum-set in the mid-1970s to replace Gabriel on lead vocals. Collinss era saw the group move toward a simpler, more soulful sound that proved eminently more popular with recordbuyers. Like Gabriel, Collins also decided to launch a career on his own, but he has since remained committed to keeping Genesis alive and has switched back and forth several times between his enormously successful solo projects and the less popular, though to him equally satisfying, Genesis collaborations. Frankly, the term art-rock has been a pain in the ass, Collins told Rolling Stone in 1982, as if to sound the territory the Collins Era would roam.

Though Collins is now the most famous member of Genesis, ironically he was not even an original member of the group, which came together as a songwriters collective called Garden Wall in the exclusive London prep school Charterhouse in 1966. The group, consisting of Gabriel, bassist Mike Rutherford, keyboardist Tony Banks, and guitarist Tony Philips, came under the tutelage of producer Jonathan King, who suggested the new name Genesis. After their first LP, From Genesis to Revelation, caused little fanfare, the members of the band retreated to an English country cottage to rehearse.

They emerged with the music for the Trespass album and a highly theatric road show which they immediately took to the far corners of Britain. During this time Philips and drummer John Mayhew quit the band and Collins and guitarist Steve Hackett joined to form the core of the first Genesis era. The band followed with the LPs Nursery Cryme and Foxtrot, which featured more of the layered, extended suites that were signature early-70s progressive rock. By this time, Gabriels propensity for donning wild costumes and acting out the storylines of the music had begun to draw media attention and a growing cult following both in England and the United States. The crowning achievement of this period was 1974s double album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, which was accompanied by an elaborate world tour featuring Gabriel as Rael, a sojourner in a surreal Manhattan landscape.

Later that same year Gabriel inexplicably left Genesis, citing conflicts within the group over how much time he was expected to devote to the band, as opposed to how much time his wife and newborn child needed him at home. Gabriel recalled in Rolling Stone that before the birth of his daughter, My wife remembers it thatI was away with the band all the time. The band remembers it that I was away with my wife all the time. Tony Banks added that it was difficult for us to accommodate that, because at that stage in the groups career, we still wanted to do as much touring as we could.

After a long search to find a suitable replacement for Gabriel, Collins sort of took over the microphone by default, and the second Genesis era had begun. The musical output of Genesis in the following years stayed basically the same on such works as Trick of the Tail and Wind and Wuthering. Meanwhile, the group remained committed to the road, playing extended world tours that culminated in the double live LP Seconds Out, recorded in Paris. Though they had dropped the costumery and theatrics, Genesis in concert still relied on plenty of the long, complex tunes from their early years, but the departure of Hackett signalled a change in musical direction for the group. The aptly titled. And Then There Were Three was released in 1977 after Hackett left the band to pursue a solo career, and Genesis soon began producing shorter, more accessible rock songs that caught the attentions of radio programming, particularly in the United States. Follow You, Follow Me from And Then There Were Three hit the top ten in Great Britain, and Misunderstanding from Duke and Abacab from Abacab both made the charts in the U.S.

It was 1981 s Abacab that signalled the full arrival of the Collins era. The album featured extensive contributions from the horn section of the American group Earth, Wind & Fire, which had appeared on Collinss highly successful solo debut Face Value and lent the Genesis sound a fresher, more direct pop quality. Collinss second solo effort, Hello, I Must Be Going (1983), was a Top Twenty album that helped to bring even more attention to Genesis, which released Three Sides Live in 1982. Seemingly caught in the middle of his band loyalties and an expanding solo career, Collins simply capitalized on both. By 1987 Genesis had produced the Collins-esque Invisible Touch LP, which produced five top ten singles and was followed by a $60 million world tour.

In the meantime Collins released his third solo record, No Jacket Required, and Mike Rutherford had surprising success with the critically and financially successful album Mike and the Mechanics (1985). Almost out of nowhere, Genesis had become hot propertyhot enough to become one of the first groups to fully capitalize on the lucrative, if not controversial, 1980s trend that saw several artists lend their names to ambitious product marketing campaigns. Suddenly Collins and Genesis were seen performing on television ads for Michelob beer, which had lent its name to the huge 1987 tour. Asked if he saw anything wrong with becoming a product spokesman, Collins told Rolling Stone: Everyone has a beerits no big deal. Were not saying to go out and get legless every night. Were just saying a beers a beers a beer.

Despite the divergent solo interests of Collins, Rutherford, and even Tony Banks, who has developed a career in film soundtrack composition, Genesis has repeatedly stated its intention to stay together, a fact that should come as good news to its longtime following. Genesis is more than a rock institution, writes Mike Clifford in The Harmony Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock. Like an old family friend, they are always dependable, always faithful, and hopefully always there. With room for solo projects, that should be the case for some time to come.

Selected discography

Trespass, ABC/Charisma, 1970; retitled In the Beginning, London/Decca, 1974.

Nursery Cryme, Charisma, 1971.

Foxtrot, Charisma, 1972.

Genesis Live, Charisma, 1973.

Selling England By the Pound, Charisma, 1973.

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, ATCO/Charisma, 1974.

A Trick of the Tail, ATCO/Charisma, 1976.

Wind and Wuthering, ATCO/Charisma, 1976.

Seconds Out, ATCO/Charisma, 1977

And Then There Were Three, ATCO/Charisma, 1978.

Duke, ATCO/Charisma, 1980.

Abacab, ATCO/Charisma, 1981.

Three Sides Live, ATCO/Charisma, 1982.

Invisible Touch, Atlantic, 1986.

And The Word Was, London, 1987.

Sources

Books

Clifford, Mike, The Harmony Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, Harmony Books, 1986.

Hardy, Phil, and Dave Laing, Encyclopedia of Rock, Schirmer, 1988.

Pareles, Jon, and Patricia Romanowski, The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock and Roll, Rolling Stone Press, 1983.

Periodicals

Rolling Stone, March 18, 1982; February 3, 1983; April 9, 1987; July 16, 1987.

David Collins

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Genesis

Genesis


The importance of the Old Testament book of Genesis in the history of science stems largely from the fact that the narrative begins with an account of creation. A wide variety of theological cosmologies were based on differing interpretations of these few verses. Most of these views hinged on two major issues of interpretation: the nature of the "beginning" and the primordial materials described in Genesis 1:12; and the six "days" described in Genesis 1:42:3.

Interpretations of Genesis 1: 12 varied with the version of the Bible that was used. The Hebrew version begins with a relative clause: "In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was a formless void . . . ." (New Revised Standard Version), much like the parallel Hebrew construction in Genesis 2:4. So the Hebrew version of Genesis began with the primordial materials of formless earth, water, and darkness (Genesis 1:2). Various interpretations of this "beginning" were possible. Some rabbis accepted the inference that God began with a pre-existent chaos and then created an ordered cosmos (Genesis Rabbah 1:5). Others brought in texts like Proverbs 8:2224 to demonstrate that God had created the water and the darkness and that the "beginning" of Genesis 1:1 was God's own wisdom as encoded in the Torah ( Jubilees 2:23; Genesis Rabbah 1:1, 9). Still others argued that God must have created worlds before this one (Genesis Rabbah 3:7; 9:2).

Most Diaspora Jews and early Christians, however, used the Greek translation of the Old Testament, known as the Septuagint. This text begins with the absolute statement: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth," which implied an absolute beginning for this universe. It also implied that the unformed earth and water were included in the initial act of creation. This reading was followed by pioneering theologians like Basil of Caesarea (c. 329379) and Augustine of Hippo (354430) and became the standard interpretation for Christians.

The meaning of the six days of Genesis 1 was also debated. Some exegetes thought there was a temporal sequence of days without specifying their exact length ( Jubilees 2:2; Genesis Rabbah 1:3). For those who accepted the idea of an absolute beginning, this implied that God created the cosmos in two stages: God made the building materials (unformed earth, water, etc.) at the beginning of the first day; then God illuminated and formed those materials as described in the narrative (Wisdom of Solomon 11:17; 4 Ezra 6:3840; Justin Martyr).

Others exegetes saw inconsistencies in the idea of a temporal sequence of days. For example, the first "day" that is described is assigned a cardinal number ("one day" rather than "first day," Genesis 1:5) in both the Hebrew and Greek versions (Genesis Rabbah 2:3; 3:9; Basil); the sun, moon, and stars appear in the narrative three days after the first evening and morning. Some Rabbis saw a nontemporal parallelism between the first three and the second three days (Genesis Rabbah 12:5). Others suggested that the ten utterances ("God said") of the narrative were patterned after the Ten Commandments or the construction of the Tabernacle (Pirqei Avot 5:1; Midrash Tanhuma). Other scholars argued that divine creation required no effort (Genesis Rabbah 12:10) and that it all might have taken place in a single instant (Philo; Midrash Tanhuma). This idea of a simultaneous creation of all things was followed by early Christian theologians like Origen (c. 185254), Athanasius (c. 293373), Basil, and Augustine.

See also Cosmology, Religious and Philosophical Aspects; Creatio Ex Nihilo; Life, Origins of


Bibliography

fretheim, terence e. "genesis." in the new interpreter's bible, vol. 1. nashville, tenn.: abingdon press, 1994

greene-mccreight, kathryn e. ad litteram: how augustine, calvin, and barth read the "plain sense" of genesis 13. new york: peter lang, 1999

levenson, jon d. creation and the persistence of evil. san francisco: harper, 1988.

neusner, jacob, trans. genesis rabbah: the judaic commentary to the book of genesis, vol. 1. atlanta, ga.: scholars press, 1985.

christopher b. kaiser

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Genesis

Genesis (jĕn´əsĬs), 1st book of the Bible, first of the five books of the Law (the Pentateuch or Torah) ascribed by tradition to Moses. Beginning with two accounts of the creation and of humankind, the narrative relates the initial disobedience of the man and the woman and their consequent expulsion from God's garden. Next is an account of the ongoing effects of human sin. The narrative then focuses on the fortunes of Abraham and his immediate descendants Isaac and Jacob. The author of Genesis perceives God's call of Abraham and God's commitment to Abraham's descendants as the divine response to the disasters that have befallen the world earlier in Genesis. It is clear that the reader is dealing with stories that were originally unconnected and have a lengthy oral history. The stories preserve memories of ancient clan migrations. In these, mythic elements from the ancient Middle East can still be felt despite ubiquitous devotion to Yahweh, the God of Israel. In the Jacob cycle, the 12 patriarchs are presented as ancestors of the tribes of the later Israeli establishment; it is likely that this represents an importation of the later notion that Israel was one people of God, with a common heritage and ancestry. During the period of the tribal confederacy (12th–11th cent. BC), these stories coalesced to tell the story of one people. Moreover, the patriarchal cycles are not biographies. These characters personify Israel's historical experience (e.g., the Jacob/Esau cycle) and its venture in faith (e.g., the Abraham cycle). For views regarding its composition see Old Testament and higher criticism.

See studies by C. Westermann (3 vol., tr. 1984–86, 1987, and 1992), N. M. Sarna (1989), R. Alter (1996), and R. Hendel (2012).

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Genesis

Genesis the first book of the Bible, which includes the stories of the creation of the world, Noah's ark, the Tower of Babel, and the patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph.

The name, recorded from late Old English, comes via Latin from Greek, ‘generation, creation, nativity, horoscope’, from the base of gignesthai ‘be born or produced’. The name was given to the first book of the Old Testament in the Greek translation (the Septuagint), hence in the Latin translation (the Vulgate).

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Genesis

Genesis First book of the Old Testament and of the Pentateuch or Torah. It probably achieved its final form in the 5th century bc, but parts may be much older. It relates the creation of the universe, from Adam and Eve to Abraham, and from Abraham to Joseph, and the descent into Egypt.

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Genesis

Gen·e·sis / ˈjenəsis/ the first book of the Bible, which includes the stories of the creation of the world, Noah's Ark, the Tower of Babel, and the patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph.

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Genesis

Genesis. The first book of the Pentateuch and opening book of the Hebrew Bible and Christian Old Testament. The Eng. title follows that of the Septuagint Gk. version, the Hebrew title Bereshith being the first word of the text.

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genesis

genesis first book of the Old Testament OE.; (mode of) origin VII. — L. — Gr. génesis generation, creation, nativity, f. *gen-, base of gígnesthai be born or produced (see KIN).
Hence genetic XIX.

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genesis

gen·e·sis / ˈjenəsis/ • n. [in sing.] the origin or mode of formation of something: this tale had its genesis in fireside stories.

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Genesis

Genesis A NASA project to collect charged particles from the solar wind and return them to Earth. It is due to be launched in 2001.

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genesis

genesisglacis, Onassis •abscess •anaphylaxis, axis, praxis, taxis •Chalcis • Jancis • synapsis • catharsis •Frances, Francis •thesis • Alexis • amanuensis •prolepsis, sepsis, syllepsis •basis, oasis, stasis •amniocentesis, anamnesis, ascesis, catechesis, exegesis, mimesis, prosthesis, psychokinesis, telekinesis •ellipsis, paralipsis •Lachesis •analysis, catalysis, dialysis, paralysis, psychoanalysis •electrolysis • nemesis •genesis, parthenogenesis, pathogenesis •diaeresis (US dieresis) • metathesis •parenthesis •photosynthesis, synthesis •hypothesis, prothesis •crisis, Isis •proboscis • synopsis •apotheosis, chlorosis, cirrhosis, diagnosis, halitosis, hypnosis, kenosis, meiosis, metempsychosis, misdiagnosis, mononucleosis, myxomatosis, necrosis, neurosis, osmosis, osteoporosis, prognosis, psittacosis, psychosis, sclerosis, symbiosis, thrombosis, toxoplasmosis, trichinosis, tuberculosis •archdiocese, diocese, elephantiasis, psoriasis •anabasis • apodosis •emphasis, underemphasis •anamorphosis, metamorphosis •periphrasis • entasis • protasis •hypostasis, iconostasis

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