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Harris, Julie 1925–

HARRIS, Julie 1925–

PERSONAL

Full name, Julia Ann Harris; born December 2, 1925, in Grosse Pointe Park, MI; daughter of William Pickett (an investment banker) and Elsie (a nurse; maiden name, Smith) Harris; married Jay I. Julien (an attorney and film producer), August 16, 1946 (divorced, July, 1954); married Manning Gurian (a stage manager and playwright), October 21, 1954 (divorced, 1967); married Walter Erwin Carroll (a writer), April 27, 1977 (divorced, 1982); children: (second marriage) Peter Alston Gurian. Education: Attended Yale University, 1944–45; trained for the stage at Perry-Mansfield School of the Dance and Theatre, 1941–43, and at the Actors Studio. Avocational Interests: Tennis, reading, gardening, knitting, cooking.

Addresses: Agent—William Morris Agency, One William Morris Place, Beverly Hills, CA 90212.

Career: Actress. Actors Studio, New York City, member of company.

Member: Actors' Equity Association, Screen Actors Guild, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, American Guild of Variety Artists.

Awards, Honors: Theatre World Award, 1949, for Sundown Beach; Donaldson Award, best supporting actress, 1950, for the play The Member of the Wedding; Antoinette Perry Award, Donaldson Award, and Variety-New York Drama Critics Poll, all best actress, 1952, for the play I Am a Camera; Academy Award nomination, best actress, 1953, for the film The Member of the Wedding; Sylvania Award, 1955, and Emmy Award nomination, outstanding actress in a single performance, 1956, both for "A Wind from the South," The United States Steel Hour; Antoinette Perry Award, best dramatic actress, 1956, for The Lark; Film Award nomination, best foreign actress, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, 1956, for the film I Am a Camera; Emmy Award, outstanding single performance by an actress, 1959, for "Little Moon of Alban," Hallmark Hall of Fame; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding single performance by an actress, 1960, for "Ethan Frome," DuPont Show of the Month; Emmy Award, outstanding single performance by an actress in a leading role, 1962, for "Victoria Regina," Hallmark Hall of Fame; Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best dramatic actress, 1964, for Marathon '33; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding individual achievement in entertainment by an actor or performer, 1965, for "The Holy Terror," Hallmark Hall of Fame; Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best actress in a musical, 1966, for Skyscraper; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding single performance by an actress in a leading role in a drama, 1967, for "Anastasia," Hallmark Hall of Fame; Grammy Award nomination (with others), best recording for children, c. 1968, for The Magic Fishbone/The Happy Prince/The Potted Princess; Antoinette Perry Award, best dramatic actress, 1969, for Forty Carats; Antoinette Perry Award, best dramatic actress, Drama Desk Award, outstanding performance, and Outer Critics Circle Award, best actress in a play, all 1973, for The Last of Mrs. Lincoln; Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best dramatic actress, 1974, for The au Pair Man; Antoinette Perry Award, best actress in a play, and Grammy Award, best spoken word recording, National Academy of Recordings Arts and Sciences, both 1977, for The Belle of Amherst; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding lead actress in a drama or comedy special, 1977, for "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln," Hollywood Television Theatre; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding supporting actress in a drama series, 1982, and Soap Opera Digest Award nominations, outstanding supporting actress in prime time, 1986 and 1988, all for Knots Landing; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding supporting actress in a miniseries or special, 1988, for The Woman He Loved; Elliot Norton Award, distinguished contribution to Boston theatre, and Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best actress in a play, both 1991, for Lucifer's Child; Helen Hayes Award, outstanding lead actress in a nonresident production, Washington Theatre Awards Society, 1993, for Lettice and Lovage; Saturn Award nomination, best supporting actress, Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films, 1994, for The Dark Half; National Medal of Freedom, 1994; American Express tribute, Helen Hayes awards, 1995; Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best actress in a play, 1997, for The Gin Game; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding supporting actress in a miniseries or movie, 1998, for "Ellen Foster," Hallmark Hall of Fame; Spotlight Award, Caldwell Theatre Company, 1999; Emmy Award, outstanding voice-over performance, 2000, for Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony; special Antoinette Perry Award, lifetime achievement in the theatre, 2002; honoree, A Tribute to Julie Harris, Lincoln Center, Alice Tully Hall, New York City, 2002; Pell Award for Excellence in the Arts, 2002; Exceptional Achievement Award, Women's Project and Productions, New York City, 2002; honored by the Laguna Playhouse, 2003; Drama Desk Award, career achievement, 2005; Kennedy Center Honors, 2005; inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame; Julie Harris Award for Lifetime Achievement established in her honor by Los Angeles theatrical community; honorary degrees include D.F.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1976, and degrees from Smith College, LaSalle College, Ithaca College, and Wayne State University.

CREDITS

Stage Appearances:

Atlanta, It's a Gift, Playhouse Theatre, New York City, 1945.

Henry IV, Part Two, Old Vic Company, Century Theatre, New York City, 1946.

Oedipus, Old Vic Company, Century Theatre, 1946.

Nelly, The Playboy of the Western World, Booth Theatre, New York City, 1946–47.

Arianne, We Love a Lassie, Shubert Theatre, Boston, MA, then National Theatre, Washington, DC, both 1947.

White Rabbit, Alice in Wonderland, International Theatre, then Majestic Theatre, both New York City, 1947.

Ida Mae, Sundown Beach, Belasco Theatre, New York City, 1948.

Weird sister, Macbeth, National Theatre, New York City, 1948.

Nancy Gear, The Young and Fair, Fulton Theatre, New York City, 1948, then International Theatre, New York City, 1948–49.

Angel Tuttle, Magnolia Alley, Mansfield Theatre, New York City, 1949.

Felisa, Montserrat, Fulton Theatre, 1949.

Frankie Addams, The Member of the Wedding, Empire Theatre, New York City, 1950–51.

Sally Bowles, I Am a Camera, Empire Theatre, 1951–52.

Title role, Mademoiselle Colombe, Longacre Theatre, New York City, 1954.

Jeanne d'Arc (Joan of Arc), The Lark, Longacre Theatre, 1955–56.

Mrs. Margery Pinchwife, The Country Wife, Adelphi Theatre, New York City, 1957, then Henry Miller's Theatre, New York City, 1957–58.

Ruth Arnold, The Warm Peninsula, Helen Hayes Theatre, New York City, 1959–60.

Brigid Mary Mangan, Little Moon of Alban, Longacre Theatre, 1960.

Blanche of Spain, King John, Stratford Festival of Canada, Stratford, Ontario, Canada, 1960.

Juliet, Romeo and Juliet, Stratford Festival of Canada, 1960.

Josefa Lantenay, A Shot in the Dark, Booth Theatre, 1961–62.

June, Marathon '33, American National Theatre and Academy Playhouse, New York City, 1963–64.

Ophelia, Hamlet, New York Shakespeare Festival, Public Theatre, Delacorte Theatre, New York City, then Playhouse in the Park, Philadelphia, PA, both 1964.

Annie, Ready When You Are, C. B.!, Brooks Atkinson Theatre, New York City, 1964–65.

Teresa, The Hostage, Bucks County Playhouse, New Hope, PA, 1965.

Georgina, Skyscraper (musical), Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, New York City, 1965–66.

Blanche Dubois, A Streetcar Named Desire, Falmouth Playhouse, Falmouth, MA, then Tappan Zee Playhouse, Nyack, NY, 1967.

Ann Stanley, Forty Carats, Morosco Theatre, New York City, 1968–70.

The Women, Repertory Theatre of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, 1970.

Anna Reardon, And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little, Morosco Theatre, 1971.

Claire, Voices (musical), Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York City, 1972.

Mary Lincoln, The Last of Mrs. Lincoln, American National Theatre and Academy Playhouse, 1972–73.

Mrs. Rogers, The au Pair Man, New York Shakespeare Festival, Lincoln Center, Vivian Beaumont Theater, New York City, 1973–74.

Lydia Cruttwell, In Praise of Love, Morosco Theatre, 1974–75.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson and other roles, The Belle of Amherst (solo show), Longacre Theatre, 1976, then Phoenix Theatre, London, 1977.

Gertie Kessel, Break a Leg, Palace Theatre, New York City, 1979.

Ethel Thayer, On Golden Pond, Center Theatre Group, Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, 1980.

Clarice, Mixed Couples, Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 1980–81.

Night of 100 Stars (also known as Night of One Hundred Stars), Radio City Music Hall, New York City, 1982.

Under the Ilex, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 1983, then Long Wharf Theatre, New Haven, CT, 1984.

Night of 100 Stars II (also known as Night of One Hundred Stars), Radio City Music Hall, 1985.

Tusitala, 1988.

Melissa Gardner, Love Letters, Promenade Theatre, New York City, 1989.

Girl, Scrooge's niece, and fan, A Christmas Carol, Hudson Theatre, New York City, 1990.

Is He Still Dead?, Long Wharf Theatre, 1990.

Baroness Karen Blixen/Isak Dinesen, Lucifer's Child (solo show), John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Eisenhower Theater, Washington, DC, then Music Box Theatre, New York City, 1991, also Boston, MA, 1991.

Eunice, The Fiery Furnace, Circle Repertory Company, Lucille Lortel Theatre, New York City, 1993, L.A. Theatre Works, 1995.

Amanda Wingfield, The Glass Menagerie, Roundabout Theatre Company, Criterion Center Stage Right Theatre, New York City, 1994–95.

Sonya, Phoenix Theatre, Purchase, NY, 1996.

Fonsia Dorsey, The Gin Game, National Actors Theatre, Lyceum Theatre, New York City, 1997.

Miss Helen, The Road to Mecca, Long Wharf Theatre, 1997.

A Long Day's Journey into Night (staged reading benefit), Roundabout Theatre Company, New York City, 1997.

Annalise Morant, Scent of the Roses, A Contemporary Theatre, Seattle, WA, 1998, Helen Hayes Performing Arts Center, Nyack, NY, 1999, and Belasco Theatre, 1999.

Amber Patches (staged reading), Jack's Art Night, New York City, 1999.

Winter, Victory Gardens Theater, Chicago, IL, 1999.

The Beauty Queen of Leenane, Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theatre, Wellfleet, MA, 2000.

My Business Is to Love: Emily Dickinson in Words and Music, Lincoln Center, Alice Tully Hall, New York City, 2000.

A Tribute to Julie Harris, Lincoln Center, Alice Tully Hall, 2002.

Appeared in Currer Bell (solo show); appeared in a production in Stamford, CT, 1999, and in several benefit performances.

Major Tours:

Sally Bowles, I Am a Camera, U.S. and Canadian cities, 1952–53.

Jeanne d'Arc (Joan of Arc), The Lark, U.S. cities, 1956.

Anna Reardon, And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little, U.S. cities, 1971–72.

Emily Dickinson, The Belle of Amherst (solo show), international cities, 1976–77, between 1977–77, and 2000, then 2000–01.

Daisy Werthan, Driving Miss Daisy, U.S. cities, 1988.

Lettice Doufflet (some sources cite name as Lettice Dufay), Lettice and Lovage, U.S. cities, 1992.

Fonsia Dorsey, The Gin Game, U.S. cities, 1999.

Carrie, Fossils, U.S. cities, 2001.

Stage Work:

Guest artistic director, The Lark, Harwich Junior Theatre, West Harwich, MA, 2005.

Television Appearances; Series:

Nellie Paine, Thicker Than Water, ABC, 1973.

Elizabeth Holvak, The Family Holvak, NBC, 1975.

Lilimae Clements, Knots Landing, CBS, 1981–87.

Television Appearances; Miniseries:

Helen "Nellie" Taft, Backstairs at the White House, NBC, 1979.

Hostess, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, PBS, 1979.

Voice of Mary Chesnut, The Civil War (also known as The American Civil War), PBS, 1990.

Alice Hearn, When Love Kills: The Seduction of John Hearn (also known as Soldiers of Misfortune), CBS, 1993.

Eleanor Butler, Scarlett, CBS, 1994.

Voice, Baseball (documentary; also known as The History of Baseball), PBS, 1994.

Voice, The West (documentary), PBS, 1996.

Voice, Thomas Jefferson (documentary), PBS, 1997.

Voice of Susan B. Anthony, Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, PBS, 1999.

Television Appearances; Movies:

Katherine (some sources cite Elizabeth) Colleigh, How Awful about Allan, ABC, 1970.

Elizabeth Hall Morgan, Home for the Holidays (also known as Deadly Desires), ABC, 1972.

Karen Fielding, Columbo: Any Old Port in a Storm, NBC, 1974.

Anne Devlin, The Gift, CBS, 1979.

Girl, Annihilator, 1986.

Alice Warfield, The Woman He Loved, CBS, 1988.

Margaret Berent, Too Good to Be True (also known as Leave Her to Heaven), NBC, 1988.

Lucille Frankel, Single Women, Married Men, CBS, 1989.

Odessa Ray, They've Taken Our Children: The Chowchilla Kidnapping Story (also known as Buried Alive: The Chowchilla Kidnapping, They've Taken Our Children: The Chowchilla Kidnapping, and Vanished without a Trace), ABC, 1993.

Sook, One Christmas (also known as Truman Capote's "One Christmas"), NBC, 1994.

Mrs. Caroline Phelan, Secrets, ABC, 1995.

Sister Anthony, The Christmas Tree, ABC, 1996.

Sylvia McClain, Love Is Strange, Lifetime, 1998.

Television Appearances; Specials:

Lu, "The Good Fairy," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1956.

Jeanne d'Arc (Joan of Arc), "The Lark," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1957.

Belinda McDonald, "Johnny Belinda," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1958.

Brigid Mary Mangan, "Little Moon of Alban," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1958.

Nora Helmer, "A Doll's House," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1959.

Catherine Sloper, "The Heiress," Family Classics, CBS, 1961.

Maria, The Power and the Glory, NBC, 1961.

Queen Victoria (title role), "Victoria Regina" (also known as "George Schaefer's 'Showcase Theatre: Victoria Regina'"), Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1961.

Eliza Doolittle, "Pygmalion," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1963.

Brigid Mary Mangan, "Little Moon of Alban," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1964.

Ophelia, Hamlet, CBS, 1964.

Florence Nightingale, "The Holy Terror" (also known as "George Schaefer's 'Showcase Theatre: The Holy Terror'"), Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1965.

Title role, "Anastasia," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1967.

Ed Sullivan's Broadway, CBS, 1973.

Emily Dickinson, The Belle of Amherst, PBS, 1976.

"The Last of Mrs. Lincoln," Hollywood Television Theatre, PBS, 1976.

Jolene (some sources cite Georgia) Henderson, "Stubby Pringle's Christmas," Hallmark Hall of Fame, NBC, 1978.

Voice of Emily Roebling, Brooklyn Bridge (documentary), PBS, 1982.

Night of 100 Stars (also known as Night of One Hundred Stars), ABC, 1982.

Actors on Acting, PBS, 1984.

Voice, The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God (documentary), PBS, 1985.

Night of 100 Stars II (also known as Night of One Hundred Stars), ABC, 1985.

NBC's 60th Anniversary Celebration, NBC, 1986.

Irene Culver, The Love Boat: Who Killed Maxwell Thorn?, ABC, 1987.

Iris, "The Christmas Wife," HBO Showcase, HBO, 1988.

"Forever James Dean," Crazy about the Movies, Cinemax, 1988.

"Strange Interlude," American Playhouse, PBS, 1988.

Voice, The Congress, PBS, 1989.

"Harold Clurman: A Life of Theatre," American Masters, PBS, 1989.

"Anthony Quinn," Crazy about the Movies, Cinemax, 1990.

Herself, The Knots Landing Block Party, CBS, 1993.

Baroness Karen Blixen/Isak Dinesen, "Lucifer's Child," A & E Stage, Arts and Entertainment, 1995.

Mrs. Ethel Sanford, Little Surprises (also known as The Best Night and The Red Eye), Showtime, 1996.

Voice of Mary Todd Lincoln, "Mary Lincoln's Insanity File," Discovery Sunday, The Discovery Channel, 1996.

James Dean: A Portrait, 1996.

Grandmother Leonora Nelson, "Ellen Foster," Hallmark Hall of Fame, CBS, 1997.

Voice, Frank Lloyd Wright (documentary), PBS, 1998.

Host, Grow Old Along with Me, PBS, 1999.

(Uncredited; in archive footage) Hollywood Screen Tests: Take 1, 1999.

Herself, Broadway Legends, Trio, 2002.

Herself, Knots Landing Reunion: Together Again, CBS, 2005.

Television Appearances; Awards Presentations:

The 32nd Annual Tony Awards, 1978.

Presenter, The 35th Annual Tony Awards, CBS, 1981.

The 39th Annual Tony Awards, CBS, 1985.

The 47th Annual Tony Awards, CBS, 1993.

The 51st Annual Tony Awards, CBS, 1997.

The 28th Annual Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts, CBS, 2005.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

"Dead Man," Actors Studio, CBS, 1949.

"Salt of the Earth," Actors Studio, CBS, 1949.

"Spreading the News," Actors Studio, CBS, 1949.

"A Trip to Czardis," Actors Studio, CBS, 1949.

"You're Breaking My Heart," Actors Studio, CBS, 1949.

Guest, The Ed Sullivan Show (also known as Toast of the Town and You're the Top), CBS, 1950, 1951, 1958, 1964.

"Bernice Bobs Her Hair," Starlight Theatre, CBS, 1951.

"October Story," Goodyear Television Playhouse, NBC, 1951.

"The Happy Rest," Goodyear Television Playhouse, NBC, 1953.

Shevawn, "A Wind from the South," The United States Steel Hour, CBS, 1955.

Mattie Silver, "Ethan Frome," DuPont Show of the Month, CBS, 1960.

"Turn the Key Deftly," Sunday Showcase, NBC, 1960.

"He Who Gets Slapped," The Play of the Week, syndicated, 1961.

"The Night of the Storm," DuPont Show of the Month, CBS, 1961.

Lucy Bram, "The Robrioz Ring," Kraft Suspense Theatre, NBC, 1964.

Annamay, "Rendezvous at Arillo," Laredo, NBC, 1965.

Emma Teall, "The Calf Women," Rawhide, CBS, 1965.

Hostess, "Valentine's Day", The Bell Telephone Hour, NBC, 1966.

Isobel Cain/Vicky Cain, "Nightmare," Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theater, NBC, 1966.

Charity Jones, "The Perils of Charity Jones: Parts 1 & 2," Tarzan, NBC, 1967.

Charity Jones, "The Four O'Clock Army: Parts 1 & 2," Tarzan, NBC, 1968.

Faith, "Faith's Way," Daniel Boone, NBC, 1968.

Jennie Hall, "A Stranger Everywhere," The Big Valley, ABC, 1968.

Lucrece Lawrence, "The Rape of Lucrece," Run for Your Life, NBC, 1968.

Sarah Carter, "A Dream to Dream," Bonanza, NBC, 1968.

Therese, "Run from Death," Garrison's Gorillas, ABC, 1968.

"Jane Brown's Body," Journey to the Unknown, ABC, 1968.

Verna Ward, "The Bobby Currier Story," The Name of the Game, NBC, 1969.

Ruth "Doc" Harmon, "So Long, Baby, and Amen," The Name of the Game, NBC, 1970.

Jenny, "Wolf Track," The Men from Shiloh (also known as The Virginian), NBC, 1971.

"The Upper Hand," The Evil Touch, syndicated, 1972.

Helen, "The Guilty," Medical Center, CBS, 1973.

Janet Hubbard, "Die, Darling, Die," Hawkins, CBS, 1973.

Herself, "Souvenirs—Eleanora Duse," Camera Three, CBS, 1973.

Julie, "Kill Dan Tanna!," Vega$, ABC, 1979.

Mrs. Bixby, "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat," Roald Dahl's "Tales of the Unexpected" (also known as Tales of the Unexpected), Anglia Television and syndicated, 1979.

Mrs. Foster, "The Way up to Heaven," Roald Dahl's "Tales of the Unexpected" (also known as Tales of the Unexpected), Anglia Television and syndicated, 1979.

Lilimae Clements, "Will the Circle Be Unbroken," Knots Landing, CBS, 1980.

Margaret Hollings, "The Freshman and the Senior," Family Ties, NBC, 1986.

Guest, The Rosie O'Donnell Show, syndicated, 1997.

Hera, "Lithia," The Outer Limits, Showtime, Sci-Fi Channel, and syndicated, 1998.

Herself, Intimate Portrait: Pamela Harriman, Lifetime, 1998.

Herself, Intimate Portrait: Calista Flockhart, Lifetime, 2001.

Character Studies, 2005.

Also appeared in episodes of Ben Casey, ABC; The Bob Newhart Show, CBS; Harry O, ABC; and Philco Television Playhouse, NBC.

Television Appearances; Pilots:

Leona Miller, The House on Greenapple Road, ABC, 1970.

Elizabeth Holvak, The Greatest Gift, NBC, 1974.

Film Appearances:

The Trouble with Women, Paramount, 1947.

Frankie Addams, The Member of the Wedding, Columbia, 1952.

Abra, East of Eden (also known as John Steinbeck's "East of Eden"), Warner Bros., 1955.

Sally Bowles, I Am a Camera, Distributors Corporation of America, 1955.

Helen Cooper, The Truth about Women, Continental Distributing, 1958.

Sally Hamil, The Poacher's Daughter (also known as Sally's Irish Rogue), Show Corporation of America, 1960.

Grace Miller, Requiem for a Heavyweight (also known as Blood Money), Columbia, 1962.

Eleanor "Nell" Vance, The Haunting, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1963.

Beth Fraley, Harper (also known as The Moving Target), Warner Bros., 1966.

Miss Nora Thing, You're a Big Boy Now, Seven Arts, 1966.

Alison Landon, Reflections in a Golden Eye, Warner Bros., 1967.

Gladys, The Split, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1968.

Leona Gillings, "The Indian Spirit Guide," Journey into Midnight, Twentieth Century-Fox, 1968.

Gerrie Mason, The People Next Door, Avco-Embassy, 1970.

Betsie ten Boom, The Hiding Place, WorldWide Pictures, 1975.

Alice Fienchild, Voyage of the Damned, Avco-Embassy, 1976.

(In archive footage) America at the Movies (documentary), Cinema 5 Distributing, 1976.

Mrs. Greenwood, The Bell Jar, Avco-Embassy, 1979.

Prostitute, Connaught International, 1980.

Charlotte Bronte, Bronte, Charlotte Limited, 1983.

Voice of Clara, Nutcracker: The Motion Picture, Atlantic, 1986.

(Uncredited) Crimewave (also known as Broken Hearts and Noses and The XYZ Murders), Columbia, 1986.

Narrator, Isadora Duncan: Movement from the Soul (documentary), Geller/Goldfine, 1988.

Roz Carr, Gorillas in the Mist (also known as The Adventures of Dian Fossey and Gorillas in the Mist: The Story of Dian Fossey), Universal, 1988.

Edna Davis, HouseSitter, Universal, 1992.

Reggie DeLesseps, The Dark Half, Orion, 1993.

Narrator, Ruth Orkin: Frames of Life (short film), 1995.

Joseph's mother, Carried Away (also known as Acts of Love), Fine Line Features, 1996.

Martha McGraw, Passaggio per il paradiso (also known as Gentle into the Night, Lift to Heaven, Passage to Paradise, and Passage pour le paradis), In Pictures, 1996.

Professor Harper, Bad Manners, Phaedra Cinema, 1997.

Carlotta, The First of May, SHO Entertainment, 1999.

Herself, Loaded Gun: Life and Death and Dickinson (documentary), BuyIndies.com, 2002.

Herself, Broadway: The Golden Age, by the Legends Who Were There (also known as Broadway, Broadway: The Golden Age, and Broadway: The Movie), Dada Films, 2004.

Jo McMillen, The Way Back Home (also known as Forgive Us Our Trespasses and Sanford, Florida), Sanford, 2005.

(In archive footage) Herself, James Dean: Forever Young (documentary), Warner Bros., 2005.

Some sources cite an appearance in Beyond the Pale.

Film Work:

Sound assistant, The Legend of Alfred Packer, American National Enterprises, 1980.

Radio Appearances; Specials:

"The Queen of Darkness," WOR Mystery Theatre, WOR (New York City), 1975.

"The Autumn Garden," The Play's the Thing, L.A. Theatre Works, 2001.

Appeared in Mrs. Klein, L.A. Theatre Works, recorded at Guest Quarters Suite Hotel, Santa Monica, CA.

RECORDINGS

Albums:

(With others) Skyscraper (cast album), Capitol, 1965.

Julie Harris, 1991.

Audiobooks:

Reading out Loud: Julie Harris, American Library Association/Westinghouse, 1960.

Let's Listen, Caedmon, 1963.

Tennessee Williams, The Glass Menagerie, Caedmon, 1964.

Edgar Lee Masters, Spoon River Anthology, Caedmon, 1965.

The Hostage, Columbia, 1965.

American Poems of Patriotism, Caedmon, 1966.

The White House Saga, Caedmon, 1966.

Curtain Going Up, Leo the Lion Records, 1967.

Discovering Rhythm and Rhyme in Poetry, Caedmon, 1967.

The Magic Fishbone/The Happy Prince/The Potted Princess, Leo the Lion Records, 1967.

Miracles, Caedmon, 1967.

Emily Dickinson, Emily Dickinson, a Self Portrait, Caedmon, 1968.

Bernard Evslin, Heroes, Gods and Monsters of the Greek Myths, Spoken Arts, 1968.

A Gathering of Great Poetry for Children, Caedmon, 1968.

Eugene Field, Wynken, Blynken, and Nod, and Other Poems, Caedmon, 1970.

O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi, and Other O. Henry Stories, Caedmon, 1970.

H. A. Rey and Margret Rey, Curious George and Other Stories about Curious George, Caedmon, 1972.

The Arabian Nights; The Story of Scheherazade, Caedmon, 1972.

The Chimera, Spoken Arts, 1972.

King Midas and the Golden Touch, Spoken Arts, 1972.

Stories to Help Children of Divorce, Caedmon, 1972.

H. A. Rey and Margret Rey, Curious George Learns the Alphabet, and Other Stories about Curious George, Caedmon, 1973.

Anne Frank, Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, Spoken Arts, 1974.

Louisa May Alcott, Little Women (excerpts), Caedmon, 1975.

William Shakespeare, Tales from Shakespeare, Caedmon, 1975.

Petunia, Caedmon, 1975.

Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House in the Big Woods, RCA, 1976.

The Belle of Amherst, Credo, 1976.

Margaret Sidney, Five Little Peppers and How They Grew, Caedmon, 1977.

Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (abridged version), Caedmon, 1980.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, Dove Books on Tape, 1985.

Baroness Karen Blixen/Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa, 1988.

The Esquire Readings: 21 Complete Stories (also known as The Esquire Readings), 1988.

H. A. Rey and Margret Rey, Curious George: Carry-Along Book and Cassette, HarperCollins, 1991.

E. B. White, Stuart Little, Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, 1991.

Beryl Markham, West with the Night, Audio Partners, 1992.

Great American Poetry: Three Centuries of Classics, Audio Partners, 1993.

A New Day: Meditations for Personal and Spiritual Growth, 1994.

Timothy Mason, The Fiery Furnace, L.A. Theatre Works, 1995.

Raymond Carver, Great American Writers: 21 Unabridged Stories, 1996.

Sappho, Sappho—Touched by Eros: Sappho's Most Sensual Masterpieces, 1996.

Enchanted Tales: The Nightingale, the Bremen Town Musicians, the Elfin Grove, the Hunting of the Snark, BMP Audio, 1996.

The Silver Lining: 23 of the World's Most Distinguished Actors Read Their Favorite Poems, 1996.

Victoria and Albert, Audio Partners, 1996.

Baroness Karen Blixen/Isak Dinesen, An Isak Dinesen Feast: A Performance Anthology, 1997.

Isaac Bashevis Singer, Shadows on the Hudson, 1998.

Arthur Miller, All My Sons, 2000.

E. B. White, Stuart Little: 60th Anniversary, 2006.

WRITINGS

Nonfiction:

(With Barry Tarshis) Julie Harris Talks to Young Actors, Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1971.

OTHER SOURCES

Periodicals:

American Theatre, May, 2001, p. 88.

Variety, June 28, 1999, p. 81.

Washington Post, February 12, 2005, pp. C1, C8; December 4, 2005, p. N5.

Electronic:

Playbill Online, http://www.playbill.com, June 15, 1999; June 8, 2001.

Theatermania, http://www.theatermania.com, May 12, 2000.

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Harris, Julie

Julie Harris, 1925–2013, American actress, b. Grosse Point, Mich. Harris made her New York debut in It's a Gift (1945). Her versatility and power won her enormous critical acclaim, and she appeared in more than 30 Broadway productions. Outstanding among her many stage performances were leading roles in Macbeth (1948), Member of the Wedding (1950; film, 1952), I Am a Camera (1952; film, 1956), The Lark (1955), Forty Carats (1968), The Last of Mrs. Lincoln (1972), and The Gin Game (1997), as well as her one-woman performance as Emily Dickinson in The Belle of Amherst (1976). Harris's films include East of Eden (1955), The Haunting (1963), The Bell Jar (1979), Gorillas in the Mist (1988), and The Dark Half (1993). On television, Harris had a long-running (1979–87) role on Knots Landing and parts in many other productions, among them the Emmy-winning Little Moon of Alban (1958) and Victoria Regina (1962). Her five Tony awards for best actress (plus a lifetime achievement Tony) are a record.

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