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racquets

racquets, game played by two or four persons on a court 60 by 30 ft (18.3 m by 9.1 m); it is surrounded by three walls 30 ft (9.1 m) high and a backwall 15 ft (4.6 m) high. The ball, 1 in. (2.54 cm) in diameter, is made of polyethylene with an adhesive tape cover. The gut-strung racket is 30 in. (76.2 cm) long, has a circular head about 8 in. (20 cm) in diameter, and weighs 8 to 10 oz (about .25 kg). A service line is painted horizontally across the front wall a little over 9.5 ft (2.9 m) from the ground, and a short-line is painted 36 ft (11 m) from, and parallel to, the front wall. A line also extends from the center point of the short-line into two service courts. The rules of the game are similar to those of squash racquets. The hardness and speed of the ball makes racquets one of the fastest and most dangerous games. It originated in 18th-century England, probably in debtors' prisons, but was soon adopted by the wealthier classes. Expensive racquets courts were built in England, and racquets was introduced into the United States in the 19th cent. by way of Canada. The United States Racquets Association annually conducts national championship matches. The sport's popularity is limited to the NE United States and certain areas of Great Britain.

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"racquets." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"racquets." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/racquets

"racquets." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/racquets

racquets

racquets Game played by two or four people in an enclosed 18.3 × 9.1m (60 × 30ft) court. Each player uses a gut-strung racket with a circular head. A service line is painted on the front wall at a height of 2.9m (9.6ft) and a fixed wooden board, also on the front wall, extends 68.6cm (27in) up from the floor. These are the markers that determine when a ball is in play. The serve must be put in play above the service line and must then land behind a short line, marked 7.3m (24ft) from the back wall. Games are played to 15 points.

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"racquets." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"racquets." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/racquets

"racquets." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved July 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/racquets