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shoe

shoe, foot covering, usually of leather, consisting of a sole and a portion above the sole called an upper. In prehistoric times skins or hides may have been tied around the foot for protection and warmth; studies of the foot bones of ancient humans suggest that some form of sturdy footwear was worn by human beings beginning between 40,000 and 26,000 years ago. The shoes found with the 5,300-year-old "Ice Man" in the Tyrolean Alps were made of skins and braided-bark netting and stuffed with straw and moss; an even older, leather shoe, some 5,500 years old, was found in 2008 in an Armenian cave. The sandal, a very early form of the shoe, was worn in Egypt, Greece, and Rome; a more ancient example (c.8000 BC), woven from plant materials, was found in an Oregon cave. An early form of the boot was also known in Greece and Rome. The characteristic shoe of the Middle Ages was the soft, clinging moccasin, which extended to the ankle. It was highly decorated and was of velvet, cloth of gold, and, increasingly, of leather. By the 13th cent. the toe had become greatly elongated until a century later the point had to be held aloft by a chain attached to the knee. After 1377 wooden clogs, called poulaines or pattens, were introduced. A forerunner of the heeled shoe, they were fastened under the shoe (if not a part of the shoe itself) to protect it from mud or water. The chopine, an ornamental shoe with a very high sole, went to fantastic heights. After 1500, styles reversed themselves, and the width of the toe was exaggerated; two colors and slashing were often employed to complement the costume. The high heel came into fashion with Elizabeth's reign in the late 16th cent. and was worn by both men and women; the shoe was colorfully decorated with rosettes, lace, and embroidery. France introduced (c.1600) the high-top boot which developed into the cavalier's boot with its wide, floppy top. The late 17th cent. saw the emergence of the square toe, high tongue, and buckles. Heels were lowered, becoming the French curved heel, until they disappeared (c.1780). With the new Empire styles, flat soft shoes with ribbon ties became the style for women, and military boots became the vogue for men. Guilds of shoemakers or cobelers existed in the Middle Ages; in the American colonies, the earliest known shoemaker was Thomas Beard, who arrived in Salem, Mass., in 1629. Early shoemakers worked at home, in small shops, or as itinerant workers who went to homes to make up the annual supply. Hand processes were used until c.1833; thereafter the rapid invention and development of machinery revolutionized the industry; today over 180 different kinds of machines are employed. As machinery became more specialized and the use of leather became primary, shoe styles and measurements became more refined and exact. From the high button shoe of the late 19th cent. to the low-cut pump of modern times (popular after 1920), the range of materials has increased, and styles are designed for every purpose and need.

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"shoe." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"shoe." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/shoe

shoe

shoe / sh/ • n. 1. a covering for the foot, typically made of leather, with a sturdy sole and not reaching above the ankle. ∎  a horseshoe. 2. something resembling a shoe in shape or use, in particular: ∎  a drag for a wheel. ∎  short for brake shoe. ∎  a socket, esp. on a camera, for fitting a flash unit or other accessory. ∎  a metal rim or ferrule, esp. on the runner of a sled. ∎  a box from which cards are dealt in casinos at baccarat or some other card games. • v. (shoes , shoe·ing / shoōing/ ; past and past part. shod / shäd/ ) [tr.] (often be shod) fit (a horse) with a shoe or shoes. ∎  (be shod) (of a person) be wearing shoes of a specified kind: his large feet were shod in sneakers ∎  protect (the end of an object such as a pole) with a metal shoe: the four wooden balks were each shod with heavy iron heads. ∎  fit a tire to (a wheel). PHRASES: be (or put oneself) in another person's shoes be (or put oneself) in another person's situation or predicament: if I'd been in your shoes I'd have walked out on him. dead men's shoes property or a position coveted by a prospective successor but available only on a person's death. if the shoe fits, wear it used as a way of suggesting that someone should accept a generalized remark or criticism as applying to themselves. the shoe (or Brit. boot) is on the other foot the situation, in particular the holding of advantage, has reversed. shoe leather inf. used in reference to the wear on shoes through walking: you can save on shoe leather by giving us your instructions over the telephone. wait for the other shoe to drop inf. be prepared for a further or consequential event or complication to occur.DERIVATIVES: shoe·less adj.

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"shoe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoe-1

"shoe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoe-1

shoe

shoe shoes are the emblems of St Crispin and St Crispinian.
be (or put oneself) in another person's shoes be (or put oneself) in another person's situation or predicament.
dead men's shoes property or a position coveted by a prospective successor but available only on a person's death (see also it's ill waiting for dead men's shoes).
if the shoe fits, wear it proverbial saying, late 18th century, meaning that one has to accept it when a particular comment is shown to apply to oneself. The saying is found mainly in the US, and is a variant of if the cap fits, wear it.
wait for the other shoe to drop be prepared for a further or consequential event or complication to occur.
where the shoe pinches where one's difficulty or trouble is.

See also for want of a nail the shoe was lost.

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"shoe." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoe." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoe

"shoe." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoe

shoe

shoe outer covering for the foot OE.; horseshoe XIV; various transf. senses from XV. OE. sċō(h) = OS. skōh (Du. schoen), OHG. scuoh (G. schuh) ON. skōr, Goth. skōhs :- Gmc. *skōχaz or *skōχwaz, with no known cogns.
Hence shoe vb. pt., pp. shod. OE. sċōg(e)an.

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"shoe." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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shoe

shoeaccrue, adieu, ado, anew, Anjou, aperçu, askew, ballyhoo, bamboo, bedew, bestrew, billet-doux, blew, blue, boo, boohoo, brew, buckaroo, canoe, chew, clew, clou, clue, cock-a-doodle-doo, cockatoo, construe, coo, Corfu, coup, crew, Crewe, cru, cue, déjà vu, derring-do, dew, didgeridoo, do, drew, due, endue, ensue, eschew, feu, few, flew, flu, flue, foreknew, glue, gnu, goo, grew, halloo, hereto, hew, Hindu, hitherto, how-do-you-do, hue, Hugh, hullabaloo, imbrue, imbue, jackaroo, Jew, kangaroo, Karroo, Kathmandu, kazoo, Kiangsu, knew, Kru, K2, kung fu, Lahu, Lanzhou, Lao-tzu, lasso, lieu, loo, Lou, Manchu, mangetout, mew, misconstrue, miscue, moo, moue, mu, nardoo, new, non-U, nu, ooh, outdo, outflew, outgrew, peekaboo, Peru, pew, plew, Poitou, pooh, pooh-pooh, potoroo, pursue, queue, revue, roo, roux, rue, screw, Selous, set-to, shampoo, shih-tzu, shoe, shoo, shrew, Sioux, skean dhu, skew, skidoo, slew, smew, snafu, sou, spew, sprue, stew, strew, subdue, sue, switcheroo, taboo, tattoo, thereto, thew, threw, thro, through, thru, tickety-boo, Timbuktu, tiramisu, to, to-do, too, toodle-oo, true, true-blue, tu-whit tu-whoo, two, vendue, view, vindaloo, virtu, wahoo, wallaroo, Waterloo, well-to-do, whereto, whew, who, withdrew, woo, Wu, yew, you, zoo

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"shoe." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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