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ill

ill he that has an ill name is half hanged someone with a bad reputation is already half way to being condemned on any charge brought against him (compare give a dog a bad name and hang him). The saying is recorded from the late 14th century.
ill gotten goods never thrive something which is acquired dishonestly is unlikely to be the basis of lasting prosperity. The saying is recorded from the early 16th century, but a related idea is found in the Philippics of the Roman orator and statesman Cicero (106–43 bc), ‘things ill gotten slip away in evil ways.’
ill weeds grow apace used to comment on the apparent success enjoyed by an ill-doer, as well as humorously on the physical growth achieved by an allegedly naughty child (in Shakespeare's Richard III, it is used by Richard of his nephew). The saying is recorded from the late 15th century.
it's an ill bird that fouls its own nest traditional condemnation of a person who brings their own family, home, or country into disrepute by his words or actions. The saying is recorded from the mid 13th century.
it's an ill wind that blows nobody any good good luck may arise from the source of another's misfortune; proverbial saying, mid 16th century.
it's ill waiting for dead men's shoes often used of a situation in which one is hoping for a position currently occupied by another; the saying is recorded from the mid 16th century.

See also it's ill speaking between a full man and a fasting, it is ill sitting at Rome and striving with the Pope, never speak ill of the dead.

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