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Doublet

Doublet

The doublet, a slightly padded short overshirt, usually buttoned down the front, with or without sleeves, was one of the essential men's garments of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The basic form of the doublet came from the pourpoint, a padded shirt that was originally worn by knights under their armor. This form-fitting shirt was soon worn by most upper-class men. While the basic shape of the doublet remained the same, the garment was modified in many ways over the course of the several centuries in which it was worn, thus keeping it in fashion.

The name doublet referred to the duplicate layers of material used to make the shirt. The inner lining was usually made of linen, while the outer layer was made of heavy silk. Depending on the current fashion, these layers were filled with various amounts of bombast, or padding. During the late fifteenth and early sixteenth century padding was added to the shoulders and upper arms, making the shoulders look very broad. One fashion of the late sixteenth century was called a peascod-belly, which made the lower stomach area so filled with padding that it made a man look pregnant. The doublet usually ended right at the waist and sometimes came to a point in the front. It was worn at first with a short skirt and later with breeches, a type of pants, and hose.

The doublet was a key garment in the transition from the long, draped garments of the Middle Ages to the more fitted styles of the Renaissance. At first the doublet was buttoned all the way to the neck, but during the late fifteenth century the neckline of the doublet opened to a wide V shape, the better to show off the linen shirts and ruffs, or pleated collars, that were becoming fashionable. The sleeves showed changes, varying from tightly fitting from shoulder to wrist, to very puffy at the upper arms. Often sleeves were separate garments that were fastened at the shoulder, with the fasteners hidden by small wings on the doublet. Beginning in the late fifteenth century, doublets were one of the primary garments to use slashing, a fashion statement that involved making small slits in the outer fabric of the doublet and then pulling out or revealing pieces of the inner lining.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Laver, James. Costume and Fashion: A Concise History. 4th ed. London, England: Thames and Hudson, 2002.

Payne, Blanche, Geitel Winakor, and Jane Farrell-Beck. The History of Costume. 2nd ed. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

Yarwood, Doreen. The Encyclopedia of World Costume. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1978.

[See also Volume 2, Europe in the Middle Ages: Pourpoint ; Volume 3, Fifteenth Century: Dagging and Slashing ; Volume 3, Sixteenth Century: Sleeves ]

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"Doublet." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Doublet." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/doublet

"Doublet." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/doublet

DOUBLET

DOUBLET.
1. One of two or more WORDS derived from one source: fragile/frail, from Latin fragilis, the first directly, the second through Old FRENCH frele. Three such words are triplets: cattle/chattel/capital, from LATIN capitale. Some doublets show little resemblance: thesaurus/treasure, from GREEK thesaurós (a store), the first directly through Latin, the second through Latin then Old French trésor. Doublets vary in closeness of meaning as well as form: guarantee/warranty are fairly close in form and have almost the same meaning; abbreviate/abridge are distant in form but close in meaning (though they serve distinct ends); costume/custom are fairly close in form but distant in meaning, but both relate to human activities. See COGNATE, NORSE.

2. A game invented in the 1870s by Lewis CARROLL, in which a given word should be changed, letter by letter and always forming another word, into a second given word: for example, ‘drive pig into sty’ in the sequence pig, wig, wag, way, say, sty. Carroll called the given words doublets, the interposed words links, and the complete series a chain.

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doublet

dou·blet / ˈdəblət/ • n. 1. either of a pair of similar things, in particular: ∎  either of two words of the same historical source, but with two different stages of entry into the language and different resultant meanings, for example fashion and faction, cloak and clock. ∎  (doublets) the same number on two dice thrown at once. ∎  Physics & Chem. a pair of associated lines close together in a spectrum or electrophoretic gel. ∎  a combination of two simple lenses. 2. a man's short close-fitting padded jacket, commonly worn from the 14th to the 17th century.

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"doublet." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"doublet." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/doublet-0

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doublet

doublet (hist.) close-fitting body garment for men XIV; one of two things exactly alike XVI. — (O)F. doublet, f. double; see prec. and -ET.

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"doublet." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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doublet

doubletmallet, palette, pallet, valet •tablet • pamphlet • aglet • anklet •candlelit • hamlet •Caplet, chaplet •lamplit • flatlet • mantlet •haslet, Hazlitt •scarlet, Scarlett, starlet, starlit, varlet •armlet • lancelet • branchlet •martlet, tartlet •plantlet • pellet • reglet • necklet •playlet • lakelet • bracelet •platelet, statelet •wavelet • leaflet • eaglet • streamlet •billet, filet, fillet, millet, skillet, willet •driblet, triblet •piglet • singlet • gimlet • inlet •kinglet, ringlet, springlet, winglet •ripplet, triplet •wristlet •eyelet, islet, stylet, twilit •pikelet •collet, Smollett, wallet •goblet • rodlet •omelette (US omelet) • droplet •torchlit •corselet, corselette •gauntlet (US gantlet) • owlet •townlet • toadlet • notelet • toilet •moonlit • sextuplet • fruitlet •bullet, pullet •booklet, brooklet, hooklet •quadruplet • annulet • septuplet •rivulet • quintuplet •gullet, mullet •doublet • floodlit •runlet, sunlit •couplet • cutlet • frontlet • violet •coverlet • circlet • verselet

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